AGENDA


Environment and Planning Committee

 

Monday, 09 November 2020

7.00pm

 

 

Dragon Room (Level 1,Georges River Civic Centre,

Hurstville)

and

Skype Online Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Georges River Council –        Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                       Page 2

 

        Environment and Planning

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

1.     OPENING

2.     ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

3.     APOLOGIES / LEAVE OF ABSENCE

4.     NOTICE OF WEBCASTING

5.     DISCLOSURES OF INTEREST

6.     PUBLIC FORUM

7.     CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING

ENV042-20       Confirmation of the Minutes of the Environment and Planning Committee meeting held on 12 October 2020

(Report by Executive Services Officer)................................. 3  

8.     COMMITTEE REPORTS

ENV043-20       Draft 2021/22 Budget – Consideration of the Preparation of Open Space Expansion and Acquisition Plan

(Report by Strategic Planner/Information Management)......... 8

ENV044-20       Draft 21/22 Budget – Consideration of the Plans of Management Program

(Report by Manager Strategic Planning).............................. 29

ENV045-20       Summary of Development Applications Lodged and Determined - July 2020 to September 2020

(Report by Manager Development and Building).................. 39

ENV046-20       Planning Proposal for LEP 2021 - Amendment to Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020

(Report by Strategic Planner/Urban Designer)..................... 51  

 

 


Georges River Council – Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                              Page 3

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETINGS

Item:                ENV042-20   Confirmation of the Minutes of the Environment and Planning Committee meeting held on 12 October 2020 

Author:            Executive Services Officer

Directorate:     Office of the General Manager

Matter Type:    Previous Minutes

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

That the Minutes of the Environment and Planning Committee Meeting held on 12 October 2020 be confirmed.

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Minutes of the Environment and Planning Committee Meeting held on 12 October 2020, as attached, be confirmed by the Committee as a true and correct record of that meeting.

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1

Minutes of the Environment and Planning Committee - 12/10/2020


Georges River Council - Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                               Page 7


Georges River Council - Environment and Planning - Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                               Page 28

COMMITTEE REPORTS

Item:                ENV043-20   Draft 2021/22 Budget – Consideration of the Preparation of Open Space Expansion and Acquisition Plan 

Author:            Strategic Planner/Information Management

Directorate:     Environment and Planning

Matter Type:    Committee Reports

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

That Council consider the allocation of $150,000 within the 2021/2022 draft budget for the preparation of a detailed open space expansion and acquisition plan that addresses the following:

a)     Identification of areas lacking open space throughout the local government area;

b)     Identification of actions for increasing the supply of open space;

c)     Investigation of opportunities to dispose of open space (i.e. pocket parks) to fund the embellishment of and acquisition for larger higher quality parks;

d)     Funding models to provide for the acquisition and maintenance of open space; and

e)     Program for the delivery of the actions.

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Council at its meeting held on 24 February 2020 resolved the following:

That the General Manager prepare a report to Council which investigates options to create more green/open space within the local government area (LGA), with a focus on those precincts where density has increased in recent years and addresses, amongst other things, the following:

·        Identification of the areas within the LGA where residents do not have access to open space in accordance with the new standards identified in the South District Plan;

·        Outlines the strategies and actions that Council has undertaken to improve the quality and increase the supply of green/open space within the LGA;

·        An overview of models and approaches other councils and government agencies have implemented to increase the supply of green space/open space and investigate international examples of creative and cost effective solutions to increasing the amount of green space / open space in areas where land is very expensive and scarce, as is the case in the Kogarah North Precinct;

·        Options that Council could explore for acquiring green/open space or gaining access to privately owned open space; and

·        An estimation of the costs associated with increasing the supply of green/open space in the LGA and the funding models available to Council to secure open space for the future.

2.     This report addresses the matters identified in the Council resolution to address the lack of open space within the Georges River Local Government Area.

 

3.     The report recommends the preparation of open space expansion and acquisition plan and requests the Council consider the funding of the plan in the 2021/22 financial year.

STRATEGIC CONTEXT

Greater Sydney Region Plan – A Metropolis of Three Cities

4.     The Greater Sydney Region Plan – A Metropolis of Three Cities directs the future of Sydney to envision a 30 minute commute for residents from their “jobs, education and health facilities, services and great places”.

5.     The relevant Objectives are:

-    Objective 12: Great places that bring people together – focusing on the public realm and open spaces. Three mechanisms for delivery have been provided to achieve “great places”:

o   Well-designed built environment;

o   Social infrastructure and opportunity; and

o   Fine grain urban form.

The combination of these mechanisms provides the ground work for a socially connected community through increasing walkability and permeability. These are achieved by incorporating open space and public realm into human-scale design.

-    Objective 31: Public open space is accessible, protected and enhanced. Expanding the availability of open space through targets to ensure that all high density residential areas (over 60 dwellings/ha) are within 200m of open space and all residential areas are within 400m of open space. These benchmarks are to be applied when incorporating open space when planning new neighbourhoods.

-    Objective 32: The Green Grid links parks, open spaces, bushland and walking and cycling paths. The Greater Sydney Green Grid (mentioned later in this section) is identified as leveraging existing open space along the Georges River through urban renewal initiatives. These initiatives may be incorporated into priority corridors/opportunities and used to amend existing open space links. The open space links may be used to increase access to walking and cycling links used for transport and leisure/recreation.

South District Plan

6.     The Greater Sydney Commission’s South District Plan is the district plan under A Metropolis of Three Cities applicable for the Georges River, Sutherland and Canterbury-Bankstown LGAs. Open space is addressed in this Plan through a series of Planning Priorities. With the goal of improving sustainability, an integrated approach towards green infrastructure is identified through the plan’s Planning Priorities.

7.     Planning Priority S14 – Protecting and enhancing bushland, biodiversity and scenic and cultural landscapes and better managing rural areas. Urban bushland and remnant vegetation must be managed as significant green infrastructure.  Maintenance in these areas may be used as an effective means of enhancing and protecting the area’s scenic landscape and cultural features.

8.     Planning Priority S15 – Increasing urban tree canopy cover and delivering Green Grid connections. Working with A Metropolis of Three Cities and the Greater Sydney Green Grid, open space throughout the Georges River area may be linked through strategically locating open space and a continuous urban tree canopy. This approach will require consultation with adjoining Councils and the Greater Sydney Commission.

9.     Planning Priority S16 – Delivering high quality open space. Drawing directly from the South District Plan, this Priority sets benchmarks for maximum distances for open space from residential development:

-    High density development (over 60 dwellings/ha) should be located within 200m of quality open space; and

-    All dwellings should be within 400m of open space.

10.   The South District Plan makes note of a number of key opportunities within the LGA, these being:

-        Enhance access to the Georges River for residents of the Georges River and Sutherland LGAs;

-        Link Bankstown to the Georges River and the Georges River National Park via Salt Pan Creek and Riverwood. Improve access to the Salt Pan Creek Corridor from Riverwood and Punchbowl; and

-        Improve access to parklands on the headlands and bays of the Georges River.

-        Improve pedestrian and cycle connections across the river.

11.   The Plan identifies an additional four projects which impact land along Council’s foreshore areas. These are:

-     Oatley Park to Gannons Park Link (a pedestrian and cycling pathway and boardwalk connecting two regionally important reserves);

-     Neverfail Bay to Yarran Road Link (improvements to the connectivity of Old Como bridge which links to the southern side of the river);

-     Dover Park East Foreshore Access (opening up opportunities for a public access pathway linking the series of currently isolated parks along Kogarah Bay between Tom Uglys Point Reserve and Dover Park East); and

-     Clarendon Road to Riverwood Park Link.

Sydney Green Grid 5 – South District

12.   The Sydney Green Grid is a NSW Government Architect plan supporting linked open space throughout Sydney. It is divided up into six districts for regions of Sydney. The plan applicable for the Georges River LGA is Sydney Green Grid 5 – South District. The plan specifies two key projects which impact land within the Georges River LGA which are:

-     Georges River Parklands; and

-     Salt Pan Creek Open Space Corridor.

13.   The Georges River Parklands and Salt Pan Creek Open Space Corridor transect LGAs surrounding the Georges River LGA. For this reason, the responsibility of maintaining these green spaces extends beyond Georges River Council alone. Collaboration with other councils and organisations will be required to implement the Green Grid planning.

14.   The Green Grid supports the development of linkages and facilities, such as boardwalks, staircases and hand rails, continuously along the Georges River. The Sydney Green Grid does not identify the source of the funding for these developments. The source of funding is particularly important where linkages may require the acquisition of land not owned by Council. If funding is to be provided from more than one source, such as from more than one council and State Government departments, it would be beneficial for the Sydney Green Grid to identify the source and proportion of funding.

15.   There is a proposed linkage of underutilised open spaces along the M5 Motorway and East Hills Rail Line. An example of this is the Wolli Creek National Park, which currently runs alongside the train line, and provides linkage to the Bardwell Valley Parklands.

Draft Greener Places Design Guide

16.   Prepared by the NSW Government Architect, the Draft Greener Places Design Guide (‘draft Guide’) provides information on how to design, plan and implement green infrastructure in urban areas throughout NSW. The draft Guide provides strategies, performance criteria and recommendations to assist planning authorities, and design and development communities to deliver green infrastructure.

17.   The draft Guide provides a framework for improved public open space planning covering:

-        Public open space; and

-        Private open space.

18.   The two forms of open space are categorised into three sections, these being:

-        Open Space for Recreation;

-        Urban Tree Canopy; and

-        Bushland and Waterways.

19.   Nine strategies are provided for the provision of open space for recreation:

1.     Improve the provision and diversity of open space for recreation;

2.     Understand the demands on existing open space, and plan for open space in new and growing communities;

3.     Improve the quality of open space for better parks and facilities;

4.     Use open space to connect people to nature;

5.     Link to the network of green infrastructure;

6.     Encourage physical activity by providing better parks and better amenity;

7.     Provide open space that is multifunctional and fit for purpose;

8.     Design versatile, flexible spaces; and

9.     Consider life-cycle costs, management and maintenance.

20.   One priority which is featured is the accessibility and connectivity for people with disabilities, stricter than the benchmarks outlined in A Metropolis of Three Cities, which are also featured in this document. To increase accessibility and connectivity in open spaces, the draft guide refers to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE)’s Everyone Can Play guideline. This guideline includes a Playspace Evaluation Checklist, which contains criteria for review, ranging from no change to change required. This criteria is listed under the following headings:

1.     Can I get there?

2.     Can I play?

3.     Can I stay?

21.   There are 11 different types of outdoor recreation outlined in the draft Guide which caters for different needs:

1.     Local play for the very young (LPY)

2.     Local children’s play (LPC)

3.     Older children’s activity space (OCA)

4.     Youth recreation space (YRS)

5.     Local recreation space (LRS)

6.     Active recreation space (ARS)

7.     Large community outdoor recreation area (LCOR)

8.     Fitness and exercise space (FES)

9.     Trail and path-based recreation (TPR)

10.   Organised sport and recreation (OSR)

11.   Off-leash dog exercise area (DEA)

22.   The draft Guide also identifies a target of 40% urban tree canopy cover by 2056 and nominates the following strategies to improve canopy cover:

1.     Protect, maintain and enhance the existing urban tree canopy;

2.     Create an interconnected urban tree canopy across NSW; and

3.     Build knowledge and awareness of urban tree canopy across State and local government.

23.   The Bushland and Waterways section of the Guide identifies five key strategies to connect, protect, restore, enhance and create urban habitat:

1.     Protect and conserve ecological values;

2.     Restore disturbed ecosystems to enhance ecological value and function;

3.     Create new ecosystems;

4.     Connect people to nature; and

5.     Connect urban habitats.

Figure 1: South District Plan – Protected Natural Area and Metropolitan Rural Area (South District Plan, Figure 21)

(Source: Figure 21: South District Protected Natural Area and Metropolitan Rural Area)

Council’s Community Strategic Plan

24.   The Georges River Community Strategic Plan (CSP) 2018-2028 represents the community’s aspirations for the next 10 years.

25.   During consultation, the community identified green, open space as a priority over development. The specific open space provisions identified by the community were:

·        Bushland reserves;

·        River health, including better stormwater management to protect Georges River and its tributaries;

·        Better facilities in parks and reserves; and

·        The need for more dog parks.

26.   Key themes called Pillars were identified as important to the community through the consultation process which represent where we would like to be in 10 years. Two of the Pillars which relate to open space include:

·        Pillar 1: A protected environment and green open spaces; and

·        Pillar 3: Active and accessible places and spaces.

27.   Beneath these Pillars are a number of goals and strategies to achieve them. The goals and strategies mentioned in Council’s CSP relating to open space are listed below: 

Goals

Strategies

1.1 Council’s environmentally sustainable practices inspire everyone to protect and nurture the natural environment.

1.1.1 Ensure the Georges River area is resilient in addressing energy, water and gas usage, sustainable buildings, waste diversion, green corridors, carbon emissions and urban design.

1.1.2 Use waste management contracts and practices to divert waste from landfill sites.

1.1.3 Help everyone to contribute to a more environmentally sustainable Georges River LGA.

1.1.4 Develop and implement programs to protect and conserve the natural environment.

1.2 The LGA’s waterways are healthy and accessible.

1.2.1 Use our role on the Georges River Combined Councils’ Committee (GRCCC) to lobby State agencies and other stakeholders for a protected and enhanced Georges River.

1.2.2 Maintain marine and foreshore assets in a safe and functional condition.

1.3 Everyone has access to beautiful parks and open spaces.

1.3.1 Ensure all public parks and open spaces are accessible, well-maintained and managed to meet the recreational needs of current and future residents.

1.3.2 Review Plans of Management for sporting fields, parks, open space and bushland in the LGA.

1.3.3 Understand the potential impacts of climate change when developing design principles for parks and open spaces.

1.3.4 Use the GRC Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy to inform the provision of parks and open spaces.

3.4 Everyone has access to a range of active and passive recreation facilities.

3.4.1 Guided by the GRC Open Space and Recreation Strategy, provide contemporary passive and active recreation spaces, aquatic facilities, synthetic fields, community centres and libraries.

Georges River Council Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040

28.   The Georges River Council Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) 2040 guides land use within the LGA over the next 20 years. This document emphasises the need for Georges River residents to be within walking distance of open space from their homes. To achieve this, open space needs to be dispersed and passive open space increased around centres and train lines. The LSPS identifies the need to provide additional open space throughout the north of the LGA and in its strategic centres, these being Hurstville and Kogarah. This will significantly increase the amenity of these areas, promoting access to open space and recreational opportunities.

29.   One of the major benefits of increasing open space around strategic centres is to minimise the urban heat island effect which is caused by a concentration of paved, dark and hard surfaces prominent in higher density areas.

30.   The LSPS identifies an active open space shortage of 7.6ha throughout the LGA, which should be addressed by Council.

31.   The LSPS also identifies an opportunity to expand the South District Plan’s Green Grid to increase the LGA’s open space through connecting its already present network.

32.   The LSPS contains three key Actions under Theme 5: Environment and Open Space which have been identified as being

Local Planning Priority

Actions

P19. Everyone has access to quality, clean, useable, passive and active open and green spaces and recreation places

A103. When increasing residential density through rezoning, innovative solutions will be required for public open space to be provided in accordance with the South District Plan's standard

A106. Develop an open space expansion plan and funding program that includes exploring acquisition of land to create public open space using both government owned land and innovative solutions.

A107. Investigate the extension of the Green Grid adjacent to the Georges River foreshore and collaborate with Bayside Council to extend this on to Botany Bay.

A108. Provide for additional open space in existing high density areas through the DA process.

 

Georges River Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019-2036

33.   The Georges River Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019-2036 provides high level direction for Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities for the community until 2036. The plan focuses on two forms of open space throughout the LGA; these being existing open space and existing sports and recreation facilities. Different forms of open space are addressed in this Strategy, being active open space, passive open space and bushland throughout the LGA.

34.   While the LGA has a majority of its residents within 400m of open space, there is a lack of facilities, visibility and functionality within its local parks. To ensure safety and accessibility within parks, further works, including increasing visibility, aligning with Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles and open frontage for parks, opposed to single entrances, are recommended. Similarly, open space along railway corridors are limited and do not meet the requirement of residents’ access within 200m of high density development. Not meeting this benchmark requires a change for the health and wellbeing of residents of the LGA. Increasing connections to natural environments within urban areas should be implemented until this is resolved.

35.   While it is difficult to predict which specific sports fields will be desirable in 20 years, ensuring there is land which may be dedicated for active open space is a priority as the demand for open space will increase with population. Ensuring that Council will be able to provide for this demand in the future is crucial to identify now and accurately address this issue before there are insufficient facilities.

36.   The Strategy finds that there is a shortage of 76,000sqm (or 7.6ha) of active open space in the LGA, particularly to the north.

37.   The Strategy contains the following recommendations which will involve an increase in quality open space:

·        Planned upgrades to Harold Fraser Oval;

·        Development of a synthetic field at Peakhurst Park;

·        Master planning of Olds Park Hub, proposing improvements to the skate park and netball courts;

·        Create a green network in Hurstville and Kogarah centres;

·        Sports field upgrades for H.V. Evatt Park, Olds Park and Beverly Hills Park;

·        Stages 2 and 3 of Penshurst Park Sporting Hub Master Plan; and

·        Sports field enhancements under the Joint Use Planning Agreement with the NSW Department of Education for James Cook Technology High School, Georges River College Hurstville Boys Campus and Beverly Hills Girls High School.

Georges River Foreshore Access and Improvement Plan

38.   Council commenced the preparation of the Georges River Foreshore Access and Improvement Plan in May 2018 after receiving a grant of $132,250 from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, Coastal and Estuary Grant Program.  Council was required to match the funding and at the Council meeting held in May 2018, approved the appointment of EMM Pty Ltd to prepare the plan.

39.   The development of the Plan was staged over 2 years with the permission of the Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW Department of Planning and Industry and Environment) given the considerable field work and data collection that was required to be gathered and analysed over 18.5 kilometres of publically owned foreshore, currently managed by Georges River Council. This foreshore area extends from Captain Cook Bridge, Sans Souci to Riverwood Park on Salt Pan Creek.

40.   The Draft Georges River Foreshore Access and Improvement Plan was placed on public exhibition for a period of 60 days in order to gain community feedback on the list of potential improvement works recommended within the Plan.

41.   The draft Plan has identifies locations of publicly owned foreshore suitable for enhanced recreational access and links between key foreshore assets, opportunities to create resilient estuarine ecosystems and liveable community places.

42.   The Plan considers strategic projects where important access opportunities are identified and considered a high priority. In addition the Plan identifies foreshore improvement works to enhance amenity and recreational opportunities such as the creation of formal walking and cycling trails.

43.   The key projects identified in the Plan which will have regional benefit include:

·        Clarendon Road to Riverwood Park Link (a pedestrian and cycling pathway and boardwalk linking to existing trails in Padstow);

·        Oatley Park to Gannons Park Link (a pedestrian and cycling pathway and boardwalk connecting two regionally important reserves);

·        Neverfail Bay to Yarran Road Link (improvements to the connectivity of Old Como bridge which links to the southern side of the river);

·        Dover Park East Foreshore Access (opening up opportunities for a public access pathway linking the series of currently isolated parks along Kogarah Bay between Tom Uglys Point Reserve and Dover Park East); and

·        Sans Souci Park Improvements (redevelopment of a dilapidated facility and improvements to the park as a destination point from other trails east of the Captain Cook Bridge).

44.   Projects with primarily local benefits include:

·        Poulton Park Improvements (replacement of dilapidated foreshore protection works and the installation of a fishing platform);

·        Kyle Williams Reserve Ecological Work and Reserve Expansion (opportunities to improve connectivity and foreshore management outcomes through integrated management of all foreshore land);

·        Carss Bush Park Improvements (extension of engineered intertidal habitat into Kogarah Bay Creek and an un-named creek at the south-western extent of the park);

·        Merriman Reserve Foreshore Protection (upgrade to existing protection works);

·        Donnelly Park Improvements (amenity improvements such as seating and landscaping, plus seawall enhancements); and

·        Oatley Pleasure Grounds Asset Upgrade (repairs and replacement of assets including BBQ facilities, seawall and boat ramp).

The Plan was on public exhibition from 4 June 2020 to 3 August 2020. The recreational opportunities identified in the Plan are being prioritised and a schedule of improvement works together with concept drawings and costings are being prepared as part of the final Plan.

The final Plan will then be brought back to Council for consideration and adoption.

Summary of the Strategic Context

45.   The review of the strategic planning policy context indicates the following:

·        A common theme throughout the plans is the benchmarks for open space provisions first mentioned in A Metropolis of Three Cities. This refers to the 400m radius for open space and 200m for developments of higher density. These provisions have been accounted for within Georges River’s current open space plans (Georges River Open Space Plan, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019-2036) and are able to be used when considering the placement of certain open space throughout the LGA which is currently lacking.

·        Green Grid provisions feature regularly throughout a number of strategic plans and work to enhance and develop a linked network of open space.

·        Providing a range of open space will better provide for the diverse activities desired in open space throughout the LGA by its residents and visitors. These include active open space and passive open space (including bushland, waterways, National Parks and Reserves). This allows Council to allocate funding according to the specific use of the open space.

Areas Lacking Open Space

46.   As mentioned above, Council’s Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019 – 2036 identifies a 76,000sqm (or 7.6ha) shortage of active open space in the LGA, particularly in the north of the LGA in suburbs like Beverly Hills, Kingsgrove, Narwee and Riverwood.

47.   This Strategy also identifies an existing open space provision rate of 2.7 hectares per 1,000 people, or 27sqm per person across the LGA, which is considered to be comparable with most surrounding LGAs.

48.   When the average household size of 2.84 persons is applied in accordance with the 2016 Census statistics, this equates to an average open space provision rate of approximately 76.68sqm per dwelling across the LGA.

49.   The importance of providing both active and passive open space has been repeatedly reinforced by the community throughout the LSPS 2040 consultation process, especially the need for additional open space of various sizes and functions to cater to the demands of the growing population.

50.   Based on a desktop analysis of the total amount of open space in each Ward (refer Table 1 below), the Hurstville Ward located at the north-eastern corner of the LGA, which comprises of the suburbs of Beverly Hills, Hurstville (north of the railway line) and Kingsgrove (refer Figure 2 below), has the least amount of open space available to its residents, which is closely followed by the Mortdale Ward comprising of the suburbs of Mortdale, Narwee and Penshurst.

51.   It should be noted that both the Hurstville and Mortdale Wards are comprised of suburbs located in the northern portion of the LGA, where the Strategy identifies a shortage of open space.

 

Figure 2 – Location of Wards and Suburbs

 

52.   Table 1 below illustrates that the Hurstville Ward is also the Ward with the least amount of open space available per dwelling with only 22.12sqm of open space available compared to the average open space provision rate of approximately 76.68sqm per dwelling across the LGA. Furthermore, only 5.5% of the total amount of open space in the LGA is accommodated within this Ward. This is followed by the Mortdale Ward that has 29.15sqm of open space available per dwelling and accommodates 6.3% of the total amount of open space available in the LGA. The suburbs within these wards include Beverly Hills; Hurstville; Kingsgrove; Mortdale; Narwee; and Penshurst.

 

Table 1 – Breakdown of Open Space by Ward

Ward

Blakehurst

Hurstville

Kogarah Bay

Mortdale

Peakhurst

Area of Open Space (ha)

124.93

26.14

57.76

29.99

235.37

Approx. Number of Dwellings

9,778

11,819

13,553

10,287

9,355

Open Space per Dwelling (sqm)

127.77

22.12

42.62

29.15

251.60

% of Total Open Space

26.3%

5.5%

12.2%

6.3%

49.6%

 

53.   For the purpose of the above analysis, open space is comprised of land zoned RE1 Public Recreation, E1 National Parks and Nature Reserves and E2 Environmental Conservation. The number of dwellings provided is indicative only and includes all rateable properties under the ‘residential’ and ‘mixed use’ categories within Council’s records.

What strategies and actions has Council undertaken to improve the quality and increase the supply of green/open space within the LGA?

Acquisitions in a local environmental plan

54.   One strategy Council has undertaken to improve the quality and increase the supply of green/open space within the LGA is identifying land for open space acquisition in a Local Environmental Plan. It should be noted that there are number of properties identified for acquisition for open space in the existing Hurstville Local Environmental Plan (HLEP) 2012 and Kogarah Local Environmental Plan (KLEP) 2012 which have not yet been acquired by Council for open space. These properties have been carried over to the draft Georges River LEP 2020. The locations are:

·        Expansion of Johnstone Reserve, Peakhurst;

·        Expansion of open space off Belmore Road Reserve, Peakhurst;

·        Expansion of Gannons Park, Peakhurst;

·        Expansion of Woodlands Avenue Reserve, Lugarno;

·        Expansion of Beatty Street Reserve, Mortdale;

·        Expansion of Woodville Park, Hurstville;

·        Expansion of Neverfail Bay Reserve, Oatley;

·        Expansion of Quarry Reserve, Hurstville Grove;

·        Expansion of Poulton Park, South Hurstville;

·        Expansion of Redin Place Reserve, Connells Point;

·        Expansion of Reserve on Joffre Street, South Hurstville;

·        Expansion of Jubilee Oval, Carlton; and

·        Expansion of Grosvenor Street Reserve.

55.   The draft Georges River LEP 2020 only proposes the expansion of open space in two areas - Culwulla St (Nos. 26, 28 & 30) and the expansion of Peakhurst Park (being Nos. 7 Hedley Street, 13 and 15 Keith Street).

56.   Due to community opposition to the land acquisition and as the acquisition did not link to an area proposed to be increased to higher density in the draft GRLEP 2020, the report to the Georges River Local Planning Panel (LPP) recommended that the proposed open space acquisitions at 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove be deferred and that Council purchase land on the open market.

57.   In supporting the recommendation, the LPP noted the existing need for additional open space in the northern portion of the Local Government Area and encourages the Council to continue to pursue and investigate all opportunities to provide such open space including the provision of additional land in the vicinity of Peter Low Reserve as part of the preparation of the draft Local Environmental Plan in 2021/2022.

Purchase of land on the open market

58.   Purchasing land on the open market is another approach. This approach may be the appropriate option to address the deficiency of available open space in the northern portion of the LGA, particularly in the Hurstville Ward. The key principle of achieving equity across the LGA requires Council to further pursue and investigate opportunities to provide additional open space in this locality. Such purchases should be linked to a strategic assessment on an area and focused on expanding existing open space and parks.

Planning Agreement process

59.   To date, Council has not secured the provision of open space through the Planning Agreement Process – instead seeking monetary contributions.

60.   Monetary contributions can however be used to purchase open space land.

 

Plan of Management and Masterplan Review

61.   Council commenced a program to review its plans of management and masterplans over its parks and reserves in the 2018/2019 financial year which will result in an improvement in the quality of green/open space.

62.   New masterplans will now have a clear vision for the future development and the ongoing operation of parks and reserves and provide a range of compatible recreation/community opportunities for all generations.

63.   New plans of management will have objectives, management goals and action strategies which will satisfy the recreational/community needs of the community, regardless of age, sex, culture or level of ability.

Funding Opportunities

64.   Council has sought funding to improve the quality and increase the supply of green/open space within the LGA through the following projects:

65.   Salt Pan Creek Spatial Framework Development – a master plan to enhance ecological and social benefits of the Salt Pan Creek section of the Green Grid. The objectives of the Spatial Framework are as follows:

·        Set out a vision for the corridor as part of the wider Green Grid network.

·        Establish a statement of aims and objectives for the Corridor through consideration of the wider public space context that will help to define the function and purpose for the corridor.

·        Consider the regional context of the Green Grid and determine how this corridor fits into the wider context with consideration of current strategic planning, current and future connections.

·        Identify, describe and provide preliminary estimates of probable costs for catalyst projects that are either key to unlock Green Grid potential or required to resolve key open space deficits.

·        Provide recommendations on corridor governance, opportunities for collaboration, funding, maintenance and implementation staging.

·        Shovel Ready Project – as part of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s (DPIE’s) 2020 Greening Our City Grants Program, Council’s ‘Shovel Ready Project’ proposes the planting of trees readily throughout the LGA. There are two streams for this project:

Stream 1: Planting of trees/canopy expansion in areas with low canopy areas

-        Council are to prepare a grant application for the expansion of the green grid corridor from Kogarah Bay to Beverly Hills in addition to the current DPIE grant for corridor expansion;

-        Investigate collaboration with Bayside Council for green grid works in Kogarah;

-        The proposed green grid corridor includes land impacted by major developments, including the draft Beverly Hills Masterplan area and Landmark Square;

o   Beverly Hills Masterplan – If trees are planted in Masterplan areas, new trees will be required to be retained/protected during construction (as per standard conditions of consent), allowing time for trees to establish, particularly when construction is delayed;

o   Landmark – it is likely that the developer will be required to provide trees on the site as part of the proposal. The increase in tree numbers on the site may be used to link up green grid corridors and provide a more significant urban tree footprint.

Stream 2 : Innovation projects/Capital works projects

-        Council’s City Strategy and Innovation team is to review:

o   Naturalisation of Poulton Park foreshore through additional tree planting

o   Mortdale streetscape plans

o   Revitalisation works proposed by the DPIE through their green space co-contribution grant.

-        Future project: expansion of the Salt Pan Creek corridor in collaboration with Canterbury and Bankstown Council.

An overview of models and approaches other councils and government agencies have implemented to increase the supply of green space/open space, including international examples.

66.   To provide context on open space provisions surrounding the LGA, open space plans from adjoining councils are listed below.

Council

Open Space Plans

What are the implications to increase open space?

Canterbury Bankstown

-     Playgrounds and Play Spaces Strategic Plan (2018)

-     Belmore Sport and Recreation Precinct Masterplan (2019)

-     Leisure and Aquatic Strategic Plan (2019)

-     Parry Park, Lakemba Masterplan (2018)

-     Salt Pan Creek Reserve Concept Masterplan (2018)

-     Wiley Park Landscape Master Plan (2019)

 

Former Bankstown Council

-     Bankstown Open Space Strategic Plan 2022

-     Bankstown Paws in Parks (2014)

 

Former Canterbury Council

-     Canterbury Open Space Strategy 2017

-     Canterbury Open Space Needs Review (2015)

-     Canterbury Strategic Recreation Plan – Review and Audit (2013)

-     Canterbury Strategic Recreation Plan 2010

-     Expansion of certain established parks, including pocket parks.

-     Addresses access to open space in areas where it may not yet have been approved

-     A lack of open space in the north-west of the LGA provides opportunities to link with nearby green space.

-     Suitability assessment for repurposing current open space for the provision of specific off leash dog parks.

-     A number of site-specific masterplans to revitalise current open space.

-     Determining which sites are appropriate to be acquired for open space.

Sutherland Shire

-     Open Space and Recreation Strategy (2019)

-     Informs land use considering open space and recreational uses throughout the LGA.

-     Aims to meet the benchmarks of increasing the distribution of parks to ensure all properties are within 400m and high density areas within 200m of open space.

-     Preparation of Green Grid Plan.

-     Temporary use of open space for commercial, community and private events.

Bayside

-     Bayside Local Strategic Planning Statement 2020

 

Former Rockdale Council

-     Rockdale City Urban Strategy 2010

-     Cook Park Plan of Management and Masterplan (2010)

-     Muddy Creek Plan of Management (2011)

-     Plan of Management for Community Land and Public Open Space (2015)

 

Former Botany Bay Council

-     Sir Joseph Banks Park Plan of Management (1999)

-     Mascot Oval and Mascot Park Plan of Management (1996)

-     Hensley Athletic Field Draft Plan of Management (2010)

-     Local Parks Plan of Management (1999)

-     Formal Gardens Plan of Management (1999)

-     Pocket Parks Plans of Management (1996)

-     Most significant investment is around Wolli Creek, including Arncliffe and Turrella, which is an area of high housing growth.

-     There are a number of one lot acquisitions proposed         to increase the area of current parks/areas of open space, mostly pocket parks.

 

67.   The above plans provide insight into planning for open space within adjoining Council areas. The plans display a range of specific uses of these open spaces/parks, varying from LGA-wide to site specific management for parks. Drawing upon this information, it is evident that Council are following a similar approach to planning for open space. Two themes which regularly featured throughout the list of plans is the residential benchmark of all residential areas being within 400m and high density residential within 200m of open space and preparation of a Green Grid Plan. Approaches towards identifying areas lacking open space and acquisition plans to provide open space should continue to be implemented in Council’s vision for the LGA.

Examples of creative and cost effective solutions to increasing the amount of green space / open space

68.   To assist in increasing Georges River’s current lack of open space, examples both nationally and internationally have been sampled to provide creative solutions to increase supply, without significantly increasing costs. The examples are listed below:

·        The Goods Line, Sydney

Located in the corridor of a formerly disused rail line, the space has been re-used to provide open space in central Sydney, connecting Railway Square to Darling Harbour. The project offers an effective solution to providing open space in the centre of Sydney through making use of a large and disused space, perfect for use as a linear park. Reusing this space also minimises the costs associated with acquiring land for open space, as its previous, disused transport use, narrow width and great length are less attractive to developers.

·        The space includes seating and areas for both passive/active recreation. Passive recreation opportunities include routes for walking, while active recreation includes table tennis tables, which also operate to attract visitors to the area.

·        The space also provides a pedestrian route connecting large organisations, including the UTS campus and the ABC building.

(Sources:https://www.darlingharbour.com/see-and-do/the-goods-line, http://thegoodsline.aspect.net.au/)

·        Connswater Community Greenway, Belfast

Located in east Belfast, the Connswater Community Greenway connects open and green space along the Connswater, Knock and Loop Rivers. The project involved:

·        Walking and cycling paths which extend for 9km.

·        Extending and reestablishing wildlife corridors, including native tree planting.

·        Clearing waterways of rubbish.

·        Creating new, semi-natural habitats.

·        Creating spaces for recreation and events.

·        Engaging with the community in the development of the project and its ongoing use.

(Source:http://www.connswatergreenway.co.uk/project/about-connswater-community-greenway)

·        The Willingdon Linear Park, City of Burnaby

Located in the City of Burnaby near Vancouver, Willingdon Linear Park runs adjacent to Willingdon Avenue for 1.2km.  The park includes:

·        Pedestrian, cycling and close access to public transport options.

·        Pocket parks and rest areas that allow more interaction with the space.

·        New trees and the enhancement of established trees to support an urban forest that supports wildlife and minimises the urban heat island effect.

·        Increased lighting for safety and allowing the park to be used during the day and night.

·        The park can be used as a transport network between neighbourhoods and accommodating many movement options, including running, walking and cycling.

(Sources:https://www.burnaby.ca/Things-To-Do/Explore-Outdoors/Parks/Willingdon-Linear-Park.html, https://landezine-award.com/the-willingdon-linear-park/)

69.   These examples highlight effective approaches to linking open space throughout urban areas. Linear parks may offer an effective approach to addressing LGA’s lack of open space. These may be implemented throughout the LGA through plans under Greater Sydney Green Grid and further funded through grants received by Council. Additionally, Georges River can investigate cost effective approaches to increasing open space, including acquiring disused/vacant land which may be regenerated.

Funding options that Council could explore for acquiring green/open space or gaining access to privately owned open space

70.   There are a number of funding sources available that enable Council to acquire privately owned land for open space. These funding sources are outlined below:

(a)    Development contributions (also known as Section 7.11 and 7.12 contributions) – Development Contribution Plans can identify the estimated cost of the land acquisitions and project the development contributions that may be received over time from future developments in the local area to fund the proposed acquisition. Since development contributions are levied on individual developments as they occur, the timeframe to collect contributions is typically distributed across the life of the Development Contribution Plan which may be 10 to 20 years.

Council has received development contributions over time for the acquisition of land for open space identified in the existing Hurstville Section 94 Development Contributions Plan 2012 and Kogarah Section 94 Development Contributions Plan No. 5 – Open Space to respectively support the open space acquisitions identified in the HLEP 2012 and KLEP 2012.

The contributions received by Council to date under these plans for the acquisition of open space are proposed to be transferred into Council’s new Georges River Development Contributions Plan that is currently being prepared.

(b)    Future Georges River Development Contributions Plan – Council is currently preparing a new Development Contributions Plan for the whole LGA that consolidates the existing Hurstville Section 94 Development Contributions Plan 2012 and the suite of Kogarah Section 94 Development Contributions Plans.

This Plan will identify a range of facilities and services that are required to meet the demands of the future population in the LGA, including open space land acquisitions and the embellishment of open space.

It is proposed that the contributions received by Council under the current Kogarah and Hurstville Development Contribution Plans will be transferred into the new Georges River Development Contributions Plan. This will provide a funding source for the land acquisitions that are identified in this Plan as well as specify the contributions levied on future development.

(c)    Voluntary Planning Agreements (“VPAs”) – VPAs are a potential source of funding for open space land acquisitions. VPAs are an agreement entered into by a planning authority (such as Council) and a developer who has sought a change to the Local Environmental Plan (via a Planning Proposal) or has made a development application. A planning agreement can provide for the dedication of land, payment of a monetary contribution or any other public benefit to be used for a public purpose, such as the provision or embellishment of open space.

(d)    Council’s General Revenue – General Revenue assists in funding Council’s projected capital program. Council prepares Long Term Financial Plans to provide a financial projection for the next ten years based on the Community Strategic Plan and Delivery Program. As part of this process, Council identifies the projects that are required to be undertaken and can be funded by General Revenue, such as the acquisition of land for open space.

71.   In cases where certain land has been identified by Council for acquisition for the purpose of open space, Council can undertake negotiation between Council and the property owner in accordance with the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991. Furthermore, owners of residential properties that have been rezoned and designated for future acquisition may approach Council at any time and request Council to purchase the property.

Costs associated with increasing the supply of green/open space in the LGA and the funding models available to Council to secure open space for the future

72.   Council submitted information on Local Infrastructure Contributions to satisfy Ministerial Directions in July 2020. Under the Hurstville Section 94 Contributions Plan 2012 (Amended 2017), the estimated cost of open space project funding from development contributions totalled $4,831,206. As of 20 May 2020, the available funds for these projects were $334,293.

73.   The Georges River Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019-2036 provides indicative costs on embellishing passive open space within the LGA. The table can be found below:

 

Passive open space type

Estimated cost per sqm

Suburban/local parks

$350

District Parks

$650

Urban high density parks

$1,000

SUMMARY

74.   The studies within this report have identified the following key themes:

·        The benchmark featured in A Metropolis of Three Cities which refers to the 400m radius for open space and 200m for developments of higher density.

·        Supporting the implementation of the Greater Sydney Green Grid within the LGA and facilitating a linked network of open space.

·        Increasing the variety of open space provided in the LGA based on the types provided in the Draft Greener Places Design Guide.

75.   This report has identified the following issues relating to open space with the LGA:

·        The Hurstville Ward is the Ward which contains the least amount of open space available per dwelling, with only 5.5% of the total amount of open space in the LGA within this Ward, followed by the Mortdale Ward at 6.3%.

·        The following suburbs, located to the north of the LGA, have been identified as containing the least amount of open space:

i.    Beverly Hills;

ii.    Hurstville;

iii.   Kingsgrove;

iv.   Mortdale;

v.   Narwee; and

vi.   Penshurst.

·        Having identified the suburbs lacking open space, the following funding solutions may be investigated for increasing the LGA’s open space:

i.    Investigating land to be acquired for open space within the Georges River LEP22 if Council is unable to acquire land within the next two to three years.

ii.    Fund acquisition through current and/or future development contributions, VPA funding and Council’s general revenue.

·        External funding may be sought in form of grants through DPIE’s Green Grid Project and Shovel Ready Project.

NEXT STEPS

76.   This report outlines that there is a lack of public open space throughout the LGA when assessed against the NSW Government’s open space standards. Given this, it is recommended that Council take necessary steps to reduce the current deficit. As identified, the suburbs to the north of the LGA require the most attention to support healthy lifestyles and maintain the wellbeing of its residents.

77.   In order to align with the abovementioned Action A106 of Council’s LSPS, it is recommended that Council undertake the preparation of open space expansion and acquisition plan that addresses the following:

·        Identification of  areas lacking open space throughout the LGA;

·        Identification of actions for increasing the supply of open space;

·        Investigation of opportunities to dispose of the open space i.e. pocket parks to fund the embellishment of and acquisition for larger parks

·        Funding models to provide for the acquisition and maintenance of open space; and

·        Program for the delivery of the actions.

78.   The Plan will form the basis of a more detailed and structured strategy dedicated to the acquisition of open space throughout Georges River. The structure of this strategy is to be prepared during the timeframe of the study.

79.   As Council continues its Stage 2 Commercial Centres review, land for open space acquisition within these centres will be considered within Masterplanning projects. Open space provisions outside of centres will be subject to their own investigations, depending on the surrounding population of the allocated land.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

80.   The cost of the preparation of open space expansion and acquisition plan is estimated at approximately $150,000. This report recommends that the Council considers allocating funds in the 2021/2022 draft budget to fund the plan.

FILE REFERENCE

D20/238779

  


Georges River Council – Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                             Page 35

Item:                ENV044-20   Draft 21/22 Budget – Consideration of the Plans of Management Program  

Author:            Manager Strategic Planning

Directorate:     Environment and Planning

Matter Type:    Committee Reports

 

 

RECOMMENDATION:

(a)    That Council endorse the Plan of Management Program for 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 as outlined within this report.

(b)    That Council consider the allocation of $250,000 within the draft 2021/2022 Budget to complete the Crown Land reserve work for the following reserves:

a.     Merriman Reserve, Kyle Bay

b.     Oatley Point

c.     Dover Park East

d.     Oatley Park

e.     Tom Ugly’s Point Reserve

f.      Claydon Reserve

g.     Netstrata Jubilee Stadium

h.     Jubilee Park

i.      Donnelly Park

j.      Shipwrights Bay Reserve

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     This report provides an update on the Plans of Management (PoM) Review that is underway to meet the requirements of the Crown Land Management Act.

2.     In 2018/2019 reviews commenced with Olds Park Masterplan and Hurstville Oval/Timothy Reserve PoM and Masterplan.

3.     In 2019/2020 the Plan of Management review program continued with the commencement of a new PoM and Masterplan for Moore Reserve, the review of Council’s six Generic PoM, a new PoM and Masterplan for Carss Bush Park/Todd Park, and new PoM and Masterplan for the Former Oatley Bowling Club Site.

4.     In 2020/2021 the review of the Penshurst Park PoM and the Sans Souci PoM and Masterplan commenced.

5.     Previous updates have been considered by Council at meetings held in March 2019 and November 2019.

6.     The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the review and advise that the deadline of July 2021 will not be met with some Crown Land reserves still to be included in PoMs.

7.     The report recommends the Council:

a.     endorse the Plan of Management Program for 2020/2021 and 2021/2022; and

b.     considers the allocation of $250,000 within the draft 2021/2022 Budget to complete the Crown Land reserve work

BACKGROUND

Crown Land Management Act 2016

8.     The Crown Land Management Act 2016 (‘CLM Act)’ commenced on 1 July 2018 which introduced significant changes to the management of Crown Land by councils.

9.     Councils now manage their dedicated or reserved land as if it were public land under the Local Government Act 1993 (‘LG Act’).

10.   Crown Land within Georges River is classified as ‘community land’ under the LG Act, meaning that Council will be required to have Plans of Management in place for the land by July 2021.

11.   The CLM Act provides a transition period of 3 years from commencement, for councils to have these plans in place.

12.   All councils received a grant of only $30,000 from OLG to address the new requirements for Crown Land Management. This grant was fully expended in FY2018/2019.

 

Land affected by the Crown Land Management Act 2016

13.   In summary Council has received 31 Crown Reserves and work has commenced with:

a.     One PoM completed – Hurstville Oval/Timothy Reserve PoM & masterplan;

b.     Four Generic PoMs underway covering 16 of the Crown Reserves; and

c.     Four PoMs underway for 4 separate Crown Reserves.

14.   Attachment 1 provides a detailed summary of the 31 Crown Reserve parcels, if there is a current plan of management and if that PoM is currently under review.

 

Carss Bush Reserve/Todd Park

15.   Council meeting held on 27 November 2017 resolved to commence preparation of a scoping brief for the development of a Precinct Masterplan and comprehensive Plan of Management for the Carss Park Sport and Recreation Precinct comprising Todd Park.  However, following consideration of the draft 2018/19 budget, Council did not allocate funding to this POM due to other priorities.

16.   Work commenced on the PoM and new Masterplan in FY2019/2020; however has been deferred until the aquatic investigation phase is completed.

Former Oatley Bowling Club Site

17.   Council at its Meeting on 17 December 2018 resolved to commence the preparation of a new Masterplan for the former Oatley Bowling Club site and a site specific Plan of Management, and remove the site from the Hurstville Generic Plan of Management Natural Areas, adopted February 2008.

18.   Work commenced on the PoM and Masterplan in late 2019. An online community survey and community workshop was held and the PoM and Masterplan will be presented to Council in December 2020.

Council resolution dated 25 March 2019

19.   Council at its meeting held 25 March 2019 resolved:

a.     That Council note the new legislative obligations regarding the preparation of Plans of Management for the Georges River Local Government Area.

b.     That Council endorse the indicative program to be completed in the next three years as generally outlined in the report.

c.     That having regard to Council’s legislative obligations, Council allocate $250,000 in the 2019/20 budget for the review and preparation of the required Plans of Management and note the future funding requirements of approximately $250,000 per annum for the 2020/21 and 2021/22 budgets.

20.   Council at its meeting held 25 March 2019 was provided with the following indicative program for the delivery of the required PoMs:

a.       First year:

i.    4 new generic PoMs (includes 11 reserves)

ii.    Penshurst Park

iii.   Sans Souci Park

b.       Second year:

i.    Oatley Park

ii.    Oatley Point

iii.   Dover Park

iv.   Tom Uglys Point Reserve

c.       Third year:

i.    Shipwrights Bay Reserve

ii.    Jubilee Park

iii.   Parkside Drive and Harold Fraser Reserve

iv.   Merriman Reserve

21.   Council was advised that the order/timing of undertaking and completing the PoMs was subject to change due to grant funding being available.

 

Council Resolution dated 25 November 2019

22.   A revised indicative program was adopted by Council at its meeting held 25 November 2019. 

23.   The revised program is set out in Table 1 below:

Table 1 – Revised Program of PoM and Masterplan Review

FY

Park

18/19

Olds Park

 

Hurstville Oval/Timothy Reserve

 

Kogarah Park (Jubilee Oval)

19/20

Carss Bush Park

 

Moore Reserve

 

Generic Plans of Management are as follows:

·      Generic Plan of Management – General Use Areas 2007 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Natural Areas 2008  (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Parks 2007 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management  - Sportsground 2006 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Local Parks and Reserves 2010 (former Kogarah Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Local Bushland Reserves 2011 (former Kogarah Council

 

 

Former Oatley Bowling Club Site

 

2020/21

·      Oatley Park

·      Oatley Point

·      Dover Park

·      Tom Uglys Point Reserve

·      Donnelly Park

·      Hurstville Golf Course & Beverley Park Golf Links

·      Shipwrights Bay Reserve

·      Jubilee Park Reserve

·      Merriman Reserve

·      Penshurst Park

·      Sans Souci Park

Current Program on Plans of Management

24.   The plan of management work is required to be completed by July 2021.

25.   Penshurst Park PoM review commenced 1 July 2020 and the new Plan of Management and Masterplan for Sans Souci Park commenced in August 2020.

26.   The costs for the Plans of Management/masterplan work underway is approximately $300,000. The funding for the PoMs commenced in 2019/20 was not carried over by Council to the 2020/21 budget. Therefore the current 2020/21 budget of $250,000 will be utilised to complete the PoMs underway with no new plans of management commencing. Table 2 indicates the PoMs underway as at 1 July 2020.

Table 2 – Plans of Management underway as at July 2020

Project Name

Status

Plan of Management and Masterplan for former Oatley Bowling Club Site

Work commenced on the PoM and Masterplan late 2019. The PoM and Masterplan will be presented to Council in December 2020.

Generic Plans of management

Council has six generic plans of management which it is seeking to review, update and consolidate to four plans. The Generic Plans of Management are as follows:

·      Generic Plan of Management – General Use Areas 2007 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Natural Areas 2008  (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Parks 2007 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management  - Sportsground 2006 (former Hurstville Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Local Parks and Reserves 2010 (former Kogarah Council)

·      Generic Plan of Management – Local Bushland Reserves 2011 (former Kogarah Council)

The draft Plans of Management have been subject to a Stage 1 online community engagement program and was briefed to Councillors in June 2020.

Native Title advice was obtained in accordance with the provisions of CLM Act.

The Generic Plans of Management cover 236 (the majority) of Council’s open space. The new Generic PoMs will be presented to Council in December 2020 for a resolution to exhibition. 

Carss Bush Park/Todd Reserve Plan of Management and Masterplan

Work commenced on the PoM and new Masterplan in FY2019/2020; however has been deferred until the aquatic investigation phase is completed.

Moore Reserve Plan of Management and Masterplan

Work commenced on this PoM late last year.

Onsite pop-ups were held on 27 February 2020 and 29 February 2020. Councillors were briefed on the result of the consultation in May 2020 and November 2020.

Native Title advice will be required in accordance with the provisions of CLM Act.

Sans Souci Plan of Management & Masterplan

This PoM commenced in August 2020.

Native Title advice will be required in accordance with the provisions of CLM Act.

 

Penshurst Park Plan of Management

Commenced in June 2020 with initial consultation undertaken.

Native Title advice will be required in accordance with the provisions of CLM Act

 

27.   Taking into consideration the PoMs in Table 2 above there are still 10 Crown Land reserves within the LGA that will require a Plan of Management (PoM) to be developed by July 2021. All the Crown Land reserves either need a new or updated Plan of Management and 5 of the 10 reserves require a masterplan.

28.   The Crown reserves that still require inclusion in a PoM are:

a.     Crown Land Reserve No. 100242 to be incorporated into Merriman Reserve, Kyle Bay Plan of Management

b.     Crown Reserve No. 45851 to be incorporated into Oatley Point Plan of Management dated 2010

c.     Crown Reserve No. 500113 – Netstrata Jubilee Oval

d.     Crown reserve No. 500166 to be incorporated into Oatley Park Plan of Management

e.     Crown Reserve No. 500113 to be incorporated into a new Plan of Management covering Dover East Park

f.      Crown Reserve No. 68613 to be incorporated into Tom Ugly's Point Reserve Plan of Management

g.     Crown Land Reserve No. 70596 to be incorporated into Claydon Reserve Plan of Management & Beverley Park Plan of Management

h.     Crown Reserve No. 72013 to be incorporated into Jubilee Park Plan of Management

i.      Crown Reserve No. 87279 to be incorporated into Donnelly Park Plan of Management

j.      Crown Reserve No. 88727 to be incorporated into Shipwrights Bay Reserve Plan of Management

29.   The review/preparation of these plans will be undertaken in 2021/2022. However, it should be noted that this will require Council seeking a 12 month extension of time from the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to the deadline of July 2021 for completing the Crown Land reserve work for the following reserves listed above.

30.   It is recommended that the current plan of management work already underway and listed in Table 2 be completed utilising the existing funds allocated for plans of management in FY20/21 – being $250,000.00.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

31.   Council was given a grant of $30,000 to address the new requirements for Crown Land Management. This grant was fully utilised in FY2018/19.

32.   In the 2018/19 Budget, $100,000 was allocated for the update of Plans of Management on Cost Centre 2500 – these funds covered Olds Park Masterplan and Hurstville Oval/Timothy Reserve PoM and Masterplan.

33.   By Council resolution dated 25 March 2019, $250,000 was allocated in the 2019/20 budget for the review and preparation of the required Plans of Management. These funds covered:

a.     the finalisation of Olds Park Masterplan and Hurstville Oval/Timothy Reserve PoM and Masterplan;

b.     the commencement of the PoMs for the generic plans of management, Carss Busk Park/Todd Reserve; Moore Reserve; and the former Oatley Bowling Club site.

34.   Council in the FY2020/21 allocated $250,000 to the PoM work. These funds will complete:

a.     Plan of Management and Masterplan for former Oatley Bowling Club Site

b.     Generic Plans of management

c.     Carss Bush Park/Todd Reserve Plan of Management and Masterplan

d.     Moore Reserve Plan of Management and Masterplan

e.     Sans Souci Plan of Management & Masterplan

f.      Penshurst Park Plan of Management

 

35.   Additional funds over $250,000 will be required to complete the Crown land work as follows:

a.     Crown Land Reserve No. 100242 to be incorporated into Merriman Reserve, Kyle Bay Plan of Management

b.     Crown Reserve No. 45851 to be incorporated into Oatley Point Plan of Management dated 2010

c.     Crown Reserve No. 500113 – Netstrata Jubilee Stadium

d.     Crown Reserve No. 500166 to be incorporated into Oatley Park Plan of Management

e.     Crown Reserve No. 500113 to be incorporated into a new Plan of Management covering Dover East Park

f.      Crown Reserve No. 68613 to be incorporated into Tom Ugly's Point Reserve Plan of Management

g.     Crown Land Reserve No. 70596 to be incorporated into Claydon Reserve Plan of Management & Beverley Park Plan of Management

h.     Crown Reserve No. 72013 to be incorporated into Jubilee Park Plan of Management

i.      Crown Reserve No. 87279 to be incorporated into Donnelly Park Plan of Management

j.      Crown Reserve No. 88727 to be incorporated into Shipwrights Bay Reserve Plan of Management.

36.   This report recommends that the Council consider the allocation of $250,000 in the draft 2021/22 budget to enable the PoM Program to continue.

RISK IMPLICATIONS

37.   Operational risk/s identified and this report has been prepared the Council’s consideration.

38.   Under the Crown Land Management Act 2016 Council is required to have Plans of Management in place for the Crown Reserves managed by Council by July 2021. Council will not meet this deadline and an extension is required.

 

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

39.   Plans of Management are required to be placed on public exhibition in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993.  A public hearing will need to be conducted for Plans of Management that alter the existing categorisation.

 

FILE REFERENCE

18/605

D20/247556

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1

Plan of Management Update

 


Georges River Council - Environment and Planning - Monday, 9 November 2020

ENV044-20             Draft 21/22 Budget – Consideration of the Plans of Management Program

[Appendix 1]           Plan of Management Update

 

 

Page 38

 


 


 


Georges River Council – Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                             Page 50

Item:                ENV045-20   Summary of Development Applications Lodged and Determined - July 2020 to September 2020 

Author:            Manager Development and Building

Directorate:     Environment and Planning

Matter Type:    Committee Reports

 

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council receive and note the Summary of Development Applications lodged and determined within the first quarter of the 2020/2021 financial year being July 2020 to September 2020.

 

Executive Summary

1.     This report provides a snap-shot of Council’s development applications lodged and determined within the first quarter of the 2020/2021 financial year being July 2020 to September 2020.

2.     In order to consider trends and Council performance associated with development assessment; information provided within the report includes:

·        Applications Received for Processing and Determination;

·        Applications Considered by the Local Planning Panel;

·        Applications Considered by the Sydney South Planning Panel;

·        Total Application Processing Times;

·        Application Type Breakdown;

·        Estimated Value of Development Applications Determined;

·        Timeframes Associated With Undetermined Applications

·        Information pertaining to The Development Advisory Service

Background

3.     The information contained below provides a snap-shot of Council’s development applications lodged and determined within the first quarter of the 2020/2021 financial year being July 2020 to September 2020.

Applications Received for Processing and Determination –Q1 2020/2021 Financial Year

4.     The total development applications lodged (‘L’) and determined (‘D’) in the first quarter is provided as follows: 

DA (‘L’)

DA (‘D’)

MOD (‘L’)

MOD (‘D’)

REV (‘L’)

REV (‘D’)

TOTAL (‘L’)

TOTAL (‘D’)

2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July

43

31

17

23

1

1

61

55

August

30

42

18

22

0

2

48

66

September

35

49

16

25

1

1

52

75

            Table 1

5.     For ease of reference and comparative purposes a graph of all applications (DA’s, Modifications and Reviews)  for the reporting period is outlined in Figure 1 below:

Figure 1

 

Development Applications

                        Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modification Applications

                        Figure 3

 

Reviews

            Figure 4

Applications Considered - Local Planning Panel

6.     The total applications considered by the Georges River Local Planning Panel (since commencement in March 2018) is 197.  A break down per month is provided as follows: 

 

 

            Figure 5

7.     The total number of applications considered by the LPP during Q1 is 22.  These applications were considered at either a public meeting and three electronically following a previous consideration.

8.     A list of the applications considered by the Local Planning Panel in Q1 is detailed as follows:

Q1

DA No.

Address

Proposal

Officer Recommendation

LPP

Decision

Date

DA2020/0027

1D Greenbank Street Hurstville

Fitout and use of hall as a recreation facility (indoor gymnasium)

Approval

Approval

21 July 2020

DA2020/0166

10 Water Street Sans Souci

Demolition of Sans Souci Bathers Pavilion and proposed subdivision to create a new Lot 1 for the Pavilion allotment at 10 Water Street Sans Souci

Approval

Approval

21 July 2020

DA2019/0388

15 Melvin Street Beverly Hills

Demolition of existing structures and construction of a two storey, ten room boarding house over basement parking for five vehicles, landscaping and site works

Approval

Approval

21 July 2020

MOD2020/0075

36 Bunyala Street Blakehurst

Internal/ external design changes to approved DA2017/0649 being demolition of former motel, tree removal and construction of 5 storey residential flat building

Approval

Approval

21 July 2020

DA2019/0539

13-21 Wyuna Street Beverley Park

Demolition works, lot consolidation and construction of 7 storey residential flat building

Approval

Approval

6 August 2020

REV2020/0013

248 Railway Parade Kogarah

Site remediation, demolition works, construction of mixed use building, 3 levels of basement car parking, ground floor commercial and 5 levels of boarding house accommodation

Approval

Deferred to Council staff to determine following applicant submitting further palns and information to address recommender deferred commencement terms

6 August 2020

REV2020/0011

18-24 Victoria Street Kogarah

Demolition works, lot consolidation, construction of mixed use development comprising residential flat building and shop over a basement

Refusal

Refusal

6 August 2020

DA2018/0366

33-35 Treacy Street Hurstville

Construction of 13 storey mixed use development

In Principle Approval

In Principle Support – delegated back to Manager Development and Building to determine subsequent to Modification Application to Concept Approval being determined by DPIE and concurrence from State Rail and Water NSW

20 August 2020

DA2019/0135

608 Forest Road Penshurst

Demolition works, construction of 3 storey mixed use development

Approval

Refusal

20 August 2020

MOD2020/0076

506-508 Railway Parade Allawah

Modification to DA2017/0394 for demolition works, construction of residential flat building to relocate the rooftop communal open space to ground level and provide 3 additional residential units at level 5 and other design rearrangements

Approval

Approval

20 August 2020

DA2019/0638

4 Wadsley Crescent Connells Point

Demolition works, alterations and additions to existing agarage and boatshed and construction of 2-3 storey dwelling with front fence and inground swimming pool

Approval

Approval

20 August 2020

DA2020/0152

35 River Road Oatley

Remediation works of former Oatley Bowling Club site

Approval

Deferred pending submission of further details in relation to addressing visual impacts of the retaining wall including landscape and design treatment, and etails of the interim finished surface treatments prior to final certification

20 August 2020

DA2019/0626

58 Lawrence Street Peakhurst

Demolition and construction of 4 storey boarding house with basement parking, landscapting and site works

Deferred Commencement Approval

Deferral – Amended plans and delegated to Council staff for determination

3 September 2020

REV2020/0016

565 King Georges Road Penshurst

Construction of boarding house, ongrade parking, landscapting and site works

Refusal

Refusal

3 September 2020

DA2020/0146

Shop 1, 1 Treacy Street Hurstville

Fitout and use of Tenancy 1 as a restaurant

Approval

Approval

3 September 2020

DA2020/0307

8-8A Johnstone Street Peakhurst

Laying of drainage pipes within existing easement located within Johnstone Reserve to drain stormwater from development at 5 Ogilvy Street Peakhurst

Approval

Approval

3 September 2020

DA2019/0431

799 Forest Road Peakhurst

Demolition of existing structures and construction of 6 multi-unit dwellings, associated vehicle accommodation, inground swimming pool, landscaping and site works

Deferred Commencement Approval

Approval

17 September 2020

DA2019/0314

54 and 54A Noble Street Allawah

Demolition of existing structures, lot consolidation and construction of 4 storey residential flat building

Deferred Commencement Approval

Refusal

17 September 2020

DA2020/0172

121 Mi Mi Street Oatley

Alterations and additions to dwelling house

Approval

Approval

17 September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Application Processing Times

 

Determined Applications

9.     Based on the gross turn-around times of all applications (DA’s, Modifications and Reviews), the average processing times for applications determined in Q1 is as follows:

 

Timeframe for
75% of applications

Timeframe for
90% of applications

All Applications

Q1

60 days

81 days

112 days

Table 4

*The increase in the average is due to the determination of a number of older applications.

 

Undetermined Application

10.   Based on the gross turn-around times of all applications (DA’s, Modifications and Reviews), the average processing times for current and undetermined applications as at the end Q1 is as follows:

Timeframe for
75% of applications

Timeframe for
90% of applications

All Applications

Q1

54 days

71 days

99 days

 

Application Types

Estimated Value of Development Applications Determined

11.   The total estimated value of applications determined in Q1 was $161,715,164 

12.   For comparative purposes, a graph of data for 2017/2018, 2018/2019, 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years is detailed below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13.   The respective breakdown of estimated cost of works against the total number of applications determined is as follows:

 

Total Applications

Q1

$0 - $100,000

53

$100,001 - $250,000

25

$250,001 - $500,000

12

$500,001 - $1,000,000

20

$1,000,001 - $5,000,000

12

$5,000,001 - $10,000,000

1

>$10,000,000

5

Table 5

 

14.   The figures provided in Table 5 above are represented graphically as follows:

 

 

 

 

15.   For comparative purposes, the breakdown of cost of works for the 2019/2020 financial years is graphically as follows:

 

Timeframes Associated With Undetermined Applications

16.   By the end of the fourth quarter of the 2018/2019 total undetermined applications had dropped further to 284.

17.   By the end of the fourth quarter of the 2019/2020 total undetermined applications have again dropped to 239.

18.   A breakdown of the total number of the current undetermined applications is provided as follows:

Total Applications

Development Applications

151

Modifications

37

Reviews

2

TOTAL

190

Table 6

 

Advisory Service

19.    The Development Advisory Service (DAS) commenced in July 2019.

It has been introduced to help streamline the development assessment process and make it easier for community members and building professionals to access planning and development advice. Services include:

·        The Duty Planner Service 

·        Evening Development Information Sessions for community members and building professionals

·        DA Lodgement Service supported by a new self-service online booking tool,

·        Expanded Pre-lodgement Advisory Service and

·        New Complying Development Consultation Service. 

20.    For comparative purposes of pre lodgements held, the graph for 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 financial years to date is provided as follows:

Accelerated Assessment Program

As reported to Council in September 2020, Council has implemented an Accelerated Assessment Program in line with a NSW Department of Planning, Infrastructure & Environment initiative. The Accelerated Assessment Program targets smaller scale application types. The aim of the program is to fact track the determination times of these applications . The program commenced in August 2020 and to date 99 applications have been determined. The targeted application types respond to our local community as:

·        Currently 61.5% of the DAs currently under assessment by Council relate to New Dwellings, Residential Alterations and Additions and Secondary Dwellings.

·        The smaller scale application types translate to approximately $68 million worth of development works if approved.

·        There is ongoing benefit to Council in targeting these types of applications to reduce the overall number of applications on-hand at any one time and improve Council’s overall processing times.

·        The Program aligns with the Australian Federal Government Home Builder Program which provides eligible owner-occupiers (including first home buyers) with a grant of $25,000 to build a new home or substantially renovate an existing home.

·        The Program aligns with Council resolutions associated with the COVID Economic and Social Recovery Program and the DA Fee Waiver for Alterations and Additions to Dwelling Houses.

Conclusion

21.   The number of applications being determined is increasing and the total number of applications within the system is decreasing which will in turn see an improvement in the overall processing times.

22.   The Development Assessment Team continues to implement actions that assist in improving processing times and customer service.  Such actions include referral templates, standardised conditions of consent, focus on provision of development planning advice.

Financial Implications

Within budget allocation.

Risk Implications

No risks identified.

File Reference

17/2543

 

 

 

  


Georges River Council - Environment and Planning -  Monday, 9 November 2020                                                                                                                                             Page 117

Item:                ENV046-20   Planning Proposal for LEP 2021 - Amendment to Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020 

Author:            Strategic Planner/Urban Designer and Director Environment and Planning

Directorate:     Environment and Planning

Matter Type:    Committee Reports

 

 

 

Recommendation:

(a)    That Council endorses the Planning Proposal to amend the Hurstville Local Environmental Plan  2012 and Kogarah Local Environmental Plan 2012 (or if gazetted, Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020) as follows to be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway Determination under Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979: 

i.   Amend the Land Zoning Map to:

1)  rezone the Narwee Housing Investigation Area from R2 Low Density Residential to a combination of R3 Medium Density Residential and R4 High Density Residential; and

2)  rezone 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove from R2 Low Density Residential to RE1 Public Recreation and remove all associated development standards including lot size, height of buildings and floor space ratio;

ii.   Amend the Land Reservation Acquisition Map in identify 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove as land reservation acquisitions for the purpose of Local Open Space (RE1);

iii.  Amend the Lot Size Map to increase the minimum subdivision lot size: 

1)  in the proposed R3 Medium Density Residential from 450sqm to 800sqm; and 

2)  in the proposed R4 High Density Residential from 450sqm to 1,000sqm; 

iv.  Amend the Height of Buildings Map to: 

1)  increase the maximum building height in the proposed R4 High Density Residential from 9m to 13m (Narwee HIA); 

2)  amend the maximum building height applied at 33 Dora Street, Hurstville from 30m to 15m; and 

3)  amend the maximum building height applied at 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate from 21m to 15m and 21m in accordance with the existing split zoning; 

v.   Amend the Floor Space Ratio Map to: 

1)  to increase the maximum floor space ratio in the proposed R3 Medium Density Residential from 0.55:1 to 0.7:1 (Narwee HIA); 

2)  to increase the maximum floor space ratio in the proposed R4 High Density Residential from 0.55:1 to 1:1 (Narwee HIA); and 

3)  amend the maximum floor space ratio applied at 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate from 2.5:1 to 1.5:1 and 2.5:1 in accordance with the existing split zoning; 

vi.  Amend the Land Use Tables of zones R3 Medium Density Residential and R4 High Density Residential to include ‘manor houses’ and ‘multi dwelling housing (terraces)’ as land uses in ‘3 Permitted with consent’; and 

vii. Amend Clause 4.1B Minimum lot sizes and special provisions for certain dwellings to include: 

1)  minimum lot size of 800sqm for manor houses; 

2)  minimum lot width of 18m for manor houses; 

3)  minimum lot size of 800sqm for multi dwelling housing (terraces); and 

4)  minimum lot width of 21m for multi dwelling housing (terraces). 

(b)    That the Planning Proposal be placed on formal public exhibition in accordance with the conditions of any Gateway Determination issued by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

(c)    That Council provide delegation to the Director Environment and Planning to approve any minor modifications to correct any numerical, typographical, mapping, interpretation and formatting errors, if required, to improve clarity and readability.

(d)    That the submitters of rezoning requests made during the public exhibition of the Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040 and the draft Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020 be notified of Council’s policy position on their requests.

(e)    That Council endorse the consultation program outlined in the Report.

(f)     That the Council endorse the General Manager to continue discussions with the land owners of 11- 21 Monaro Avenue Kingsgrove with the intention of entering in a legal agreement with each of the property owners to enable the Council to secure the purchase of the 6 lots and to provide financial certainty for these land owners.  

(g)    That Council endorse the amended LEP Program as follows:

Stage 1: Housing and Harmonisation (completed with no change)

Stage 1B: LEP21 Housing Capacity (this Planning Proposal)

Stage 2: Housing Choice (update timeframe from 2021 to 2022)

-    Seek to promote inclusive and affordable housing

-    Investigate mechanisms such as big house conversions and build to rent to provide more housing choice across the LGA

Stage 3: Jobs and Activation (update timeframe from 2022 to 2023)

-    Review development standards in centres

-    Infrastructure delivery mechanisms

-    Review and implement the outcomes of the Hurstville City Centre and Beverly Hills Local Centre masterplans

Stage 4: Housing and Future Growth (no change to schedule for 2025 and beyond)

-    Focus on land use changes beyond the next 5 years.

 


 

Executive Summary

1.     On 7 September 2018, Council received $2,500,000 funding from the NSW Government’s Accelerated LEP Program for an accelerated review of Council’s existing LEPs and the preparation of a new LEP that aligns with the priorities outlined in the South District Plan.

2.     In accordance with the statutory agreement, the revised Planning Proposal for the Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020 (“LEP 2020”) was endorsed by the Georges River Local Planning Panel (“LPP”) at its meeting in June 2020 and was submitted to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (“DPIE”) for final legal drafting on 30 June 2020. Approximately $750,000 of the grant funding has not yet been utilised. 

3.     The draft LEP 2020 sought to harmonise and replace the existing Hurstville Local Environmental Plan 2012 (“HLEP 2012”) and Kogarah Local Environmental Plan 2012 (“KLEP 2012”). It is the first stage of a four stage approach to preparing the Georges River LEP. The staged approach was developed to enable detailed investigations to be conducted to support the full suite of actions and changes proposed by Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040 (“LSPS 2040”). 

4.     LEP 2021 is the next stage within the Georges River LEP staged approach and was endorsed by Council at its meetings in 23 April 2019 and October 2019 to focus on housing choice through the promotion of inclusive and affordable housing and the investigation of mechanisms such as big house conversions and build to rent to provide more housing choice across the local government area (“LGA”). 

5.     However before the preparation of LEP 2021 could be commenced, Council was advised by the DPIE in June 2020 that there is a shortfall of housing delivery in the LGA. Accordingly, Council must create capacity for additional dwellings to meet the Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing target of 3,450 - 4,250 dwellings (for the period from 2021 to 2026). 

6.     The DPIE also advised that the surplus grant funding of approximately $750,000 would be made available to enable the expedited preparation of a planning proposal to address this shortfall in housing delivery, subject to the submission of this planning proposal for finalisation by 31 March 2021. 

7.     The DPIE, on the review of the Local Housing Strategy, which was adopted by Council at its meeting dated 24 August 2020, considers that the LGA will struggle to meet its 0-5 year target of 4,800 additional dwellings as specified by the South District Plan. The shortfall has been identified to be approximately 700 dwellings.  

8.     Given that 2020 marks the end of the 0-5 year period, further work will need to be conducted to accommodate the shortfall of dwellings in the 0-5 year period and create flexibility for additional take up in the 6-10 year and 10-20 year dwelling targets. This will ensure Council delivers an additional 14,000 dwellings, as required, by 2036.  

9.     In response, Council, at its meeting held 24 August 2020, resolved to prepare a Planning Proposal to amend the HLEP 2012 and KLEP 2012 (or if gazetted, Georges River LEP 2020) to promote housing choice and create capacity for additional dwellings to meet the Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing target (3,450 - 4,250 additional dwellings) for the period from 2021/22 to 2025/26 

10.   The preparation of this expedited LEP 2021 has resulted in an amendment to the Council-endorsed staged LEP program.

11.   The Planning Proposal, known as LEP21, is the subject of this report (Attachment 11). The primary objective of this Planning Proposal is to identify additional housing opportunities in the LGA to meet the short term targets imposed by the State Government. In addition, this Planning Proposal also seeks to address a number of considerations unresolved by LEP 2020.

12.   In accordance with the Ministerial Direction for planning proposals, this Planning Proposal was referred to the Georges River Local Planning Panel (“LPP”) on 29 October 2020 (refer Attachment 5). The LPP provided its support for the Planning Proposal to be forwarded to the Minister or Greater Sydney Commission for a Gateway Determination under section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

13.   An Addendum Report was also presented to the LPP at this meeting with regards to the proposed inclusion of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove on the Land Reservation Acquisition Map and the rezoning of the 6 lots from R2 Low Density Residential to RE1 Public Recreation (refer Attachment 6). The LPP did not provide support for the proposed rezoning of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove and advised that further strategic documentation should be provided justifying any decision to rezone any series of properties adjacent to the Peter Lowe Reserve.

14.   The full Minutes of this LPP meeting dated 29 October 2020 are presented in Attachment 7.

15.   In summary, Council’s endorsement is sought for the following amendments to the HLEP 2012 and KLEP 2012 (or if gazetted, the Georges River LEP 2020) proposed by this Planning Proposal to be forwarded to DPIE for a Gateway Determination: 

·        Identify additional housing opportunities in the LGA through a review of future housing growth areas nominated by the Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040 (“LSPS 2040”);  

·        Contribute to the supply and diversity of housing within the LGA by creating capacity for an additional 310 dwellings through the rezoning of one of the six future housing growth areas identified by the LSPS 2040; 

·        Introduce the land uses of “manor houses” and “multi dwelling housing (terraces)” and the associated minimum lot size and lot width controls in response to the commencement of the Low Rise Housing Diversity Code in the State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008; and

·        Resolve mapping anomalies that were not included in LEP 2020 on the following sites: 

o   199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate,

o   33 Dora Street, Hurstville; and

·        Include 11-21 Monaro Avenue on the Land Reservation Map as land reserved for the purpose of Local Open Space (RE1) and rezone these properties from the existing R2 Low Density Residential zone to RE1 Public Recreation within Planning Proposal 2021.

16.   The remainder of the LEP grant funding has been committed to the preparation of a masterplan for the Mortdale Local Centre, Council’s Affordable Housing Policy, a LGA-wide Biodiversity Study and a Foreshore Scenic Character Review to further analyse the character of the foreshore localities. These projects are currently underway and will be integrated in future amendments to the LEP subject to Council’s endorsement. 

17.   This report also provides an overview of the rezoning requests received as formal submissions to the LSPS 2040 and draft LEP 2020 during public exhibition. These requests have been assessed against the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth (refer Attachment 10) and are allocated into 2 categories for the purpose of establishing a formal policy position:

A.     Investigate in Council’s Strategies (e.g. the next Housing Strategy or Part 2 of the Commercial Centres Strategy) to inform future LEP amendments

B.     No further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth or to be pursued as part of a separate process which is not led by Council

18.   This report recommends that the staff notify the submitters of Council’s position on their rezoning requests.

Background

Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040

19.   Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (“LSPS 2040”) was endorsed by the Greater Sydney Commission (“GSC”) on 10 March 2020. It sets out the land use vision for the next 20 years to strengthen the character of the LGA’s suburbs and builds upon the social, environmental and economic values of the Georges River community. It is also a key resource in highlighting the changes which will shape the LGA’s future. It includes actions that both Council and the State Government will take to create a future City which is desirable to its community, visitors and investors.  

20.   The LSPS 2040 builds on the community’s aspirations and expectations expressed in Council’s Community Strategic Plan 2018-2028 (“CSP”). Extensive community consultation was undertaken as part of the two-staged consultation program for the LSPS to gather community input on the draft vision, local planning priority outcomes and the criteria for strategic planning, including identifying location for future housing investigation. 

21.   The LSPS 2040 identifies a staged program of investigation to deliver additional housing. The following housing targets have been nominated, equating to an additional 14,000 dwellings by 2036: 

·        2016 to 2020 inclusive (0-5 year target): +4,800 dwellings as specified by the South District Plan 

·        2021 to 2026 (6-10 year target): +3,450 dwellings 

·        2026 to 2036 (11-20 year target): +5,750 dwellings 

22.   To plan for the provision of new housing, the LSPS 2040 Structure Plan (refer Figure 1 below) nominates several locations to be investigated. The areas hatched in yellow on the Structure Plan have been included in LEP 2020 as Housing Investigation Areas which will contribute to the 6-10 year housing target. The five Housing Investigation Areas will enable the provision of approximately 650 dwellings in total (hatched in yellow). The areas hatched in purple are Future Housing Investigation Areas which will be discussed further in this report.


 

Figure 1 – LSPS 2040 Structure Plan 

https://infoweb.georgesriver.nsw.gov.au/grinfocouncil/Open/2020/08/ENV_10082020_AGN_AT_files/image015.jpg

 

LEP Staged Program

23.   At its meeting dated 26 February 2018, Council resolved to prepare a principal Local Environmental Plan (“LEP”) for the Georges River local government area (“LGA”) which gives effect to the South District Plan and harmonises the following existing LEPs: 

·        Kogarah Local Environmental Plan 2012 (“KLEP 2012”);

·        Hurstville Local Environmental Plan 2012 (“HLEP 2012”); and

·        Hurstville Local Environmental Plan 1994 (“HLEP 1994”).

24.   On 7 September 2018, Council received funding from the NSW Government of $2,500,000 for an accelerated review of Council’s existing LEPs and the preparation of a new LEP that aligns with the priorities outlined in the South District Plan. The grant funding also enabled Council to prepare the Local Housing Strategy and Inclusive Housing Strategy to inform the new LEP and a local strategic planning statement for the LGA. 

25.   The Planning Proposal for the Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020 (“LEP 2020”) was revised with consideration of the public exhibition outcomes and was reported to the Georges River Local Planning Panel (“LPP”) in June 2020 seeking endorsement to submit the revised Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (“DPIE”) for final legal drafting. Approximately $750,000 of the grant funding has not yet been utilised. 

26.   At this meeting, the LPP resolved to endorse a number of revisions to the exhibited Planning Proposal for LEP 2020, including the retention of the existing Foreshore Scenic Protection Area (“FSPA”) as identified by the HLEP 2012 Foreshore Scenic Protection Area Map with the addition of the proposed Foreshore Scenic Protection Area as exhibited which includes the foreshore localities in the former Kogarah LGA to allow Council the opportunity to further define the role, mapped extent and zoning of FSPA across the LGA as part of the preparation of LEP 2021/2022. 

27.   The LEP 2020 was the first stage of a four-stage approach to preparing the principal Georges River LEP. The staged approach was developed to enable detailed investigations to be conducted to support the full suite of actions and changes proposed by Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040 (“LSPS 2040”). 

28.   The LSPS 2040 provides a ‘line of sight’ between the South District Plan and strategic planning and delivery at the local level through the Georges River LEP. It sets out the land use vision for the next 20 years to strengthen the character of the LGA’s suburbs and builds upon the social, environmental and economic values of the Georges River community. 

29.   The following staged approach to preparing the Georges River LEP is outlined in the LSPS 2040, and was endorsed by Council at its meetings in April 2019 and October 2019: 

Stage 1: Housing and Harmonisation (LEP 2020 – submitted for plan making on 30 June 2020) 

o   Harmonise the existing LEPs 

o   Seek to achieve housing targets and housing choice through upzoning certain areas 

Stage 2: Housing Choice (scheduled for 2021) 

o   Seek to promote inclusive and affordable housing 

o   Investigate mechanisms such as big house conversions and build to rent to provide   more housing choice across the LGA 

Stage 3: Jobs and Activation (scheduled for 2022) 

o   Review development standards in centres 

o   Infrastructure delivery mechanisms 

o   Review and implement the outcomes of the Hurstville City Centre and Beverly Hills Local Centre masterplans 

Stage 4: Housing and Future Growth (scheduled for 2025 and beyond) 

o   Focus on land use changes beyond the next 5 years 

30.   LEP 2021 is the next stage within the Georges River LEP staged approach and was endorsed by Council at its meetings in 23 April 2019 and October 2019 to focus on housing choice through the promotion of inclusive and affordable housing and the investigation of mechanisms such as big house conversions and build to rent to provide more housing choice across the local government area (“LGA”). 

31.   However, before the preparation of LEP 2021 could be commenced, in June 2020 Council received advice from DPIE providing additional time to utilise the surplus grant funds subject to the following conditions: 

·        That the Local Housing Strategy is submitted to the DPIE by 30 September 2020; and

·        That an additional LEP is submitted for plan making by 31 March 2021 to address the shortage of housing supply as compared to the Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing targets and the current housing pipeline of supply and completions.

32.   The Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing targets for the LGA is specified within its Letter of Support for Council’s LSPS 2040 dated 4 March 2020 (refer Attachment 1). This letter requires Council to show how the 6-10 year housing target of 3,450 - 4,250 dwellings can be met as part of its Local Housing Strategy

Local Housing Strategy and shortfall in housing delivery 

33.   The GSC’s South District Plan sets a five-year (2016 to 2021) housing target of 4,800 additional dwellings for the Georges River LGA. However, the Plan provides Council with the opportunity to develop the 6-10 year housing targets by demonstrating capacity for steady housing supply into the medium term. 

34.   The South District Plan also emphasises the need to plan for the 20-year strategic housing target. An additional 13,400 dwellings is prescribed by the State Government as the 2036 housing target for the Georges River LGA.  

35.   Council’s Local Housing Strategy (Attachment 2), which has been adopted by Council at its meeting dated 24 August 2020, was submitted to DPIE on 3 September 2020. The Strategy sets a clear plan for the provision of housing in the Georges River LGA over the next 10 and 20 years. It provides the link between GRC’s visions for housing and the Actions of the South District Plan by presenting Council’s response to how the housing target will be delivered locally.  

36.   The Local Housing Strategy analyses the DPIE’s Greater Sydney Region Local Government Area dwellings data with the intent of understanding the shortage of housing supply in meeting the 6-10 year housing target. 

37.   The analysis of DPIE’s dwellings data reveals that within the 4 year period from January 2016 to March 2020, there have been over 3,300 dwellings completed across the LGA which equates to an average of around 800 dwellings per year.  There are also a significant number of dwellings in the pipeline which are yet to be constructed. 

38.   Historic approvals and completions trends indicate that there is typically a two to three year delay/offset in the completions date as compared to the approvals date. Therefore, the majority of dwellings in the pipeline could be completed in 2021 and beyond, however due to the COVID-19 pandemic there is no guarantee that the usual development cycles will continue. 

39.   The average completion rate of 800 dwellings per year from January 2016 to March 2020 indicates that it will be challenging for the LGA to meet the South District Plan target of 4,800 dwellings for the 0-5 years’ timeframe (2016-2020 inclusive), and there will be a shortfall of approximately 700 dwellings when compared to the specified dwelling target. 

40.   To ensure Council delivers an additional 14,000 dwellings as required by 2036, further work will need to be conducted in this LEP and future LEPs to accommodate the shortfall of completions in the 0-5 year period and create flexibility for additional take up in the 6-10 year and 10-20 year dwelling targets. 

41.   The DPIE also advised that the surplus grant funding of approximately $750,000 would be made available to enable the expedited preparation of a planning proposal to address this shortfall in housing delivery. However, the NSW Government funding requires this Planning Proposal to be forwarded to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) for plan-making by 31 March 2021. 

42.   In response, Council, at its meeting held 24 August 2020, resolved to prepare a Planning Proposal to amend the HLEP 2012 and KLEP 2012 (or if gazetted, Georges River LEP 2020) to promote housing choice and create capacity for additional dwellings to meet the Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing target (3,450 - 4,250 additional dwellings) for the period from 2021/22 to 2025/26.


 

Councillors’ Briefing Workshop

43.   A workshop on 6 October 2020 was held with the Councillors to inform the preparation of this Planning Proposal for LEP21. The content of this workshop are outlined below:

·        Overall aims of LEP21;

·        Update on the status of big house conversion investigations;

·        Update on studies currently being prepared to inform the review of the Foreshore Scenic Protection Area extent;

·        The proposed development standards for manor houses and multi dwelling housing (terraces);

·        Review of the 6 additional housing growth areas identified by the LSPS 2040 to provide; and

·        The proposed zone and development standards for the Housing Investigation Area (“HIA”) to be included in this Planning Proposal.

44.   At the workshop, the Lily Street and Narwee future housing growth areas were identified as suitable options to be upzoned in LEP21. Based on considerations of the existing traffic conditions for both areas, the Narwee HIA was selected as the more appropriate location for additional residential density.

45.   Further to the workshop, an addendum presentation was circulated to the Councillors on 8 October 2020 presenting the following:

·        Further refinement in the development controls for the Narwee HIA;

·        A review of all rezoning requests received as part of the public exhibition of the LSPS 2040 and draft LEP 2020 as part of the investigation for additional housing opportunities; and

·        A review of all known mapping and zoning anomalies.

46.   No additional comments were received following the circulation of this addendum presentation.

47.   A workshop with the Councillors was held on 2 November 2020 to provide an update on the outcomes of the LPP meeting dated 29 October 2020. A recap was provided on the amendments proposed by the Planning Proposal for LEP21:

·        Upzoning of Narwee HIA;

·        Manor houses and multi dwelling housing (terraces) development standards;

·        Mapping anomalies at 33 Dora Street, Hurstville and 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate; and

·        Open space rezoning at 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove.

AMENDED LEP PROGRAM

48.   As outlined above, Stage 2 of the LEP Program was originally endorsed by Council to focus on the provision of housing choice across the LGA with specific emphasis on the promotion of inclusive and affordable housing and the investigation of mechanisms such as big house conversions and build-to-rent. It was anticipated that the preparation of these tasks would be undertaken during 2020/2021.

49.   However, DPIE’s request for Council to prepare this expedited Planning Proposal to address the existing shortfall in housing delivery has significantly altered the deliverables of LEP 2021.

50.   In response to DPIE’s request, Council resolved at its meeting dated 24 August 2020 to prepare this Planning Proposal to create capacity for additional dwellings to meet the Greater Sydney Commission’s 6-10 year housing target (3,450 - 4,250 additional dwellings) for the period from 2021/22 to 2025/26.

51.   Due to the targeted focus of the Planning Proposal for LEP21, which is to create additional housing capacity in the LGA in response to DPIE’s request, an amendment is required to the endorsed Stage LEP program to accommodate this unforeseen LEP.

52.   This report seeks Council’s endorsement of the amended LEP Program as follows:

Stage 1: Housing and Harmonisation (completed with no change)

Stage 1B: LEP21 Housing Capacity (this Planning Proposal)

Stage 2: Housing Choice (update timeframe from 2021 to 2022) 

o   Seek to promote inclusive and affordable housing 

o   Investigate mechanisms such as big house conversions and build to rent to provide more housing choice across the LGA 

Stage 3: Jobs and Activation (update timeframe from 2022 to 2023) 

o   Review development standards in centres 

o   Infrastructure delivery mechanisms 

o   Review and implement the outcomes of the Hurstville City Centre and Beverly Hills Local Centre masterplans 

Stage 4: Housing and Future Growth (no change to schedule for 2025 and beyond) 

o   Focus on land use changes beyond the next 5 years 

53.   Preparation of Council’s Affordable Housing Policy is underway which includes considerations of build-to-rent provisions and inclusionary zoning to promote inclusive and affordable housing. The draft status of this investigation is unable to provide a robust evidence base to inform this Planning Proposal.

54.   Preliminary investigation had also commenced for the adaptive re-use of existing large family homes through big house conversions. The intent of this investigation is to create a new development typology in the R2 Low Density Residential zone which will enable existing, under-utilised family homes to be converted into multiple smaller dwellings while retaining the existing local character. This will allow housing choice in areas with limited capacity for growth. 

55.   However, DPIE verbally advised Council that the big house conversion development typology must be implemented within the existing legal framework established by the Standard Instrument LEP and the creation of a new land use term will not be supported. 

56.   Furthermore, additional consideration is also required due to the complexities associated with the conversion of existing dwellings, including compliant fire separation, the types of dwelling suitable for conversion and the economic feasibility of adapting an existing house. 

57.   The complexities of this housing type in relation to establishing a workable legal land use framework and understanding the construction / built form requirements has meant that this land use cannot be included in LEP 2021, mainly due to the time constraints associated with the finalisation of this Planning Proposal by 31 March 2021.

58.   Council officers will continue with the above investigations in accordance with the amended LEP program to deliver additional housing choice in the next LEP amendment. 

59.   It should be noted that the LEP grant funding has also enabled the preparation of a masterplan for the Mortdale Local Centre which is currently underway and will also be integrated in future amendments to the LEP subject to Council’s endorsement. 

 

PLANNING PROPOSAL OVERVIEW

60.   The primary objective of this Planning Proposal is to identify additional housing opportunities in the LGA to meet the short-term targets imposed by the State Government. In addition, this Planning Proposal also seeks to address a number of considerations unresolved by draft LEP 2020. 

61.   In summary, the following amendments to draft LEP 2020 are proposed by this Planning Proposal: 

·        Identify additional housing opportunities in the LGA through a review of future housing growth areas nominated by the Local Strategic Planning Statement 2040 (“LSPS 2040”); 

·        Contribute to the supply and diversity of housing within the LGA by creating capacity for an additional 310 dwellings through the rezoning of one of the six future housing growth areas identified by the LSPS 2040;

·        Introduce the land uses of “manor houses” and “multi dwelling housing (terraces)” and the associated minimum lot size and lot width controls in response to the commencement of the Low Rise Housing Diversity Code in the State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008; and

·        Resolve mapping anomalies that were not included in LEP 2020 on the following sites:

o   199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate,

o   33 Dora Street, Hurstville; and

·        Include 11-21 Monaro Avenue on the Land Reservation Map as land reserved for the purpose of Local Open Space (RE1) and rezone these properties from the existing R2 Low Density Residential zone to RE1 Public Recreation within Planning Proposal 2021.

62.   The Planning Proposal was referred to the Georges River Local Planning Panel (“LPP”) on 29 October 2020 in accordance with the S9.1 Ministerial Directions for planning proposals; refer Attachment 5 for the LPP Meeting Agenda.

63.   The LPP provided its support for the Planning Proposal to be forwarded to the Minister or Greater Sydney Commission for a Gateway Determination under section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

64.   An Addendum Report (refer Attachment 6) was also presented to the LPP at this meeting for their consideration and support with regards to the proposed inclusion of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove on the Land Reservation Acquisition Map and the rezoning of these properties from the existing R2 Low Density Residential zone to the proposed RE1 Public Recreation zone.

65.   The LPP provided in principle support for the provision of additional open space in the north of the LGA but did not recommend for Council to proceed with the proposed rezoning of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove within the Planning Proposal for LEP21 and advised the following in response to the Addendum Report:

The Panel reiterates its recommendation made on 26 June 2020 regarding the need for additional open space in the northern portion of the Local Government Area and encourages the Council to continue to pursue and investigate all opportunities to provide such open space including the provision of additional land in the vicinity of Peter Lowe Reserve.

The Panel is also of the opinion that further strategic documentation should be provided justifying any decision to rezone any series of properties adjacent to the Reserve.

Council is therefore encouraged to undertake appropriate strategic analysis to justify the rezoning of the 6 lots (No.11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove) through voluntary sale or by compulsory acquisition means.

66.   The full Minutes of this LPP meeting dated 29 October 2020 are presented in Attachment 7.

67.   The LPP’s recommendations are noted. However, the Planning Proposal retains the rezoning and land reservation acquisition for the purpose of public open space at No.11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove. Further details are provided under the Monaro Avenue Open Space heading of this report.

68.   Furthermore since the date of the LPP meeting, an amendment has been made to the Planning Proposal in response to advice received from DPIE relating to the proposed Alteration to Gateway for the Foreshore Scenic Protection Area (“FSPA”) review.

Alteration to Gateway for FSPA

69.   At the aforementioned meeting dated 29 October 2020, the LPP considered a report on this Planning Proposal which contained the proposal to amend provisions relating to the FSPA resulting from the review of the Foreshore Scenic Character Review and the LGA-wide Biodiversity Study.

70.   However, Council received a letter from the DPIE (refer Attachment 9) on 16 October 2020 after the LPP report was prepared advising Council of the following:

·        The proposed amendments in the LEP21 Planning Proposal are to be limited to the new housing opportunities in Narwee and the housekeeping changes;

·        LEP21 must be submitted to DPIE by 31 March 2021 for finalisation;

·        All studies funded under the grant program must be completed by March 2021; and

·        While the studies for biodiversity, Mortdale Local Centre Masterplan and foreshore scenic areas can be funded under the grant program, they should underpin a further planning proposal or proposals separate to LEP21.

71.   In accordance with DPIE’s advice, this Planning Proposal has been amended to exclude any proposed changes to the FSPA. Further details are provided under the FSPA Review heading of this report.

HOUSING INVESTIGATION AREA (HIA)

HIA selection 

72.   To plan for the provision of new housing, the LSPS 2040 Structure Plan (refer Figure 1 above) nominates several locations to be investigated. The areas hatched in yellow on the Structure Plan have been included in LEP 2020 as Housing Investigation Areas which will contribute to the 6-10 year housing target. The five Housing Investigation Areas (hatched in yellow) will enable the provision of approximately 650 dwellings in total. 

73.   A total of 6 future housing growth areas (scheduled for 2025 and beyond) were identified in the LSPS in the following locations (also refer Figure 2 – hatched in purple): 

1.     Narwee 

2.     Lily Street (Hurstville) 

3.     Kingsgrove 

4.     Mortdale / Penshurst 

5.     Oatley West 

6.     South Hurstville 

 

Figure 2 – Extract from LSPS Housing Structure Plan

 

74.   The above future housing areas have been investigated as part of LEP 2021 to ascertain whether they are required to achieve the 10 year housing target set by the Greater Sydney Commission. 

75.   With consideration of the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth, the following set of guiding principles was developed to inform the selection of the Housing Investigation Area (HIA) to be included in LEP 2021:​ 

Public transport​

Housing around transport nodes provides the community with convenience and accessibility, as well as improves connectivity to jobs, services and recreation. Maintaining and improving connectivity is important as the LGA grows.  Areas along existing and committed transport links should be investigated for housing growth as a guiding principle for the selection of HIAs. 

Shops and services​

Commercial centres in the LGA play a vital role in providing a mix of amenities, essential and specialist services and retail outlets including supermarkets, local grocer, restaurants and cafes to cater to the demands for day to day goods and services close to where people live. Centres also have an important role in providing access to local employment, especially when many local centres in the LGA are co-located with transport interchanges. With improved transport connections, there will be opportunities for centres to evolve into mixed-use, walkable neighbourhoods that provide ongoing employment growth. Housing should be located in close proximity to existing centres to leverage off the amenities, services and social meeting spaces provided in these centres. Access to centres is one of the guiding principles for the selection of HIAs.

Educational establishments​

Educational establishments, such as schools and tertiary institutions, form an important part of the Georges River community. Housing in close proximity to educational establishments offer residents greater choice, accessibility and convenience, as well as the ability to access school sport and recreational facilities readily and participate in local social activities. Proximity to existing educational establishments is one of the guiding principles for the selection of HIAs. 

Community facilities

Community facilities in close proximity to housing can enhance social cohesion, build community links, increase connectivity between residents and improve community wellbeing. The LGA has a range of community facilities comprising of libraries, aquatic facilities, an entertainment centre, sports stadium, community centres and halls, and hireable community spaces. Social infrastructure needs to be available in different sizes and for different uses as the population grows and diversifies. Proximity to existing community facilities is one of the guiding principles for the selection of HIAs.

Open space​

Open space is a form of green infrastructure that enhances the character of the LGA’s neighbourhoods, supports healthy and active lifestyles, and brings communities together. Housing that is connected to a wide network of open space increases liveability and health outcomes for individuals and communities, as well as improves community building by encouraging social participation and interaction. People in urban neighbourhoods should be able to walk to local open space. Nearly all residents in the LGA currently live within 400m of open space. However, there are a number of smaller local parks that lack facilities, visibility and general functionality. The provision of open space is a key consideration when planning for growth. Locating HIAs within 400m of good quality public open spaces is a guiding principle.

Environmental constraints​

The LGA has a number of environmental constraints that could limit development potential in some locations. These constraints include flood prone land, bushfire prone land, acid sulfate soils, coastal hazard, riparian lands and watercourses and foreshore protection areas. Placing development in hazardous areas or increasing the density of development in areas with limited evacuation options increases risk to people and property. Accordingly, as a guiding principle, HIAs should be located in areas with minimal environmental constraints and risks managed through preventative and protective measures. 

Heritage and strata buildings​

Heritage is an important part of the built environment and contributes to a sense of identity and history in the LGA. Council’s aim is to conserve and protect the LGA’s heritage so it can be enjoyed by current and future generations. However, balancing housing growth with heritage conservation and protection objectives can be challenging.  Development proposals will need to ensure any increase in density appropriately responds to the existing heritage significance of the item or heritage conservation area. Hence, in principle, the bulk and scale of developments in HIAs must be responsive and sympathetic to the existing heritage significance of housing areas.

Transition in density and built form

The Local Housing Strategy acknowledges that a harmonised hierarchy of residential zones is required to regulate the built form, typology and transition between the low and high density zones. To ensure a diverse range of housing is created in appropriate locations, medium density developments under a ‘true’ medium density zone should be investigated in accessible locations to act as a buffer around high density zones. As a principle, the existing maximum height of building control of 9 metres will apply to medium density housing to encourage appropriate built forms and typologies within the proposed R3 Medium Density Residential zone and a maximum building height of 12 metres in the R4 High Density Residential zone.

 

76.   Table 1 below outlines the findings of the preliminary assessment undertaken for the 6 housing growth areas. In summary, the Narwee future housing area has been selected to be accelerated as a Housing Investigation Area in this Planning Proposal to provide capacity for additional dwellings and greater housing choice. 

 

Table 1 – Housing Investigation Area Selection for LEP 2021 

No.

Map

Explanation

1

Narwee

 

This area is well serviced in relation to public transport by the existing Narwee Railway Station (within walking distance) and related bus services. The area benefits from road access to the M5 and the M8 Motorways. There are no existing issues in the local road system known to Council.

 

The area is currently zoned R2 Low Density Residential. Most of the building stock are detached dwelling houses in a garden setting and are of varying ages and styles. The lots are rectangular, and the local road system is a lineal grid.

 

There is also an area of land zoned R4 High Density Residential, closer to the Railway Station and Narwee village.

 

The area is immediately south of the Narwee village, that is zoned B2 Local Centre. This would provide future residents with very good access to goods and services. Note: The majority of this village is in the adjacent LGA of Canterbury-Bankstown. 

 

The area has good, existing, accessible local recreational resources, including Rasdall Park, Narwee Park and Progress Park. It also has access to existing primary and secondary educational facilities.

 

The area has no heritage items or heritage conservation areas (HCAs). It has a very limited number of strata titles, which is positive. This is because strata title properties often act as a constraint to redevelopment, when areas are rezoned and/ or uplifted.

 

Parts of the area are identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. The Narwee area is affected by the Moomba to Sydney Ethane (MSE) Pipeline – it is within the Notification Zone of the MSE Pipeline that runs through the northern portion of the LGA. A hazard analysis will be required to support any increase in residential density to identify the potential risk impacts.

 

The Narwee area represents a very good opportunity for Council to revitalise and improve an established, relatively unconstrained part of the LGA.

 

The preliminary traffic assessment indicates that the existing local road network can support the proposed uplift. 

2

Lily Street

 

The Lily Street area is well serviced in relation to public transport by Allawah Rail Station (within walking distance). 

 

The area is currently zoned R2 Low Density Residential. The lots are rectangular on a lineal grid street pattern. Immediately east of the area is the Bayside LGA. The area is well serviced by the Hurstville City Centre (zoned B4 Mixed Use and to the west) and the Forest Road village centre (zoned B2 Local Centre and to the north). 

  

The area provides an interface opportunity to transition from the large scale/high density City Centre environment e.g. East Quarter, Landmark Square and Bing Lee.  

 

The area has access to existing educational facilities and to the locally significant open space of Kempt Field which offers both active and passive recreation opportunities as well as an adventure playground.  

 

The area has a limited number of heritage items and strata-titled properties and it is not located within a HCA.  

 

Parts of the area are identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. Measures such as free boarding above the flood level will need to be implemented in future developments. 

 

However this area has been ruled out for immediate rezoning/ uplift in the LEP 2021 because of the known existing local road issues that require resolution. This is supported by preliminary traffic data that the Council has commissioned. The proposed developments at the surrounding areas including Landmark Square, Bing Lee and East Quarter will be accompanied by improvement works for local roads. This will improve the traffic network within this precinct; however the work is not scheduled to be completed for another 4 to 5 years. 

 

In addition, the future rezoning/ uplifting potential for this area will be better known once planning investigations have been completed for the two adjacent commercial centres - Hurstville City Centre and Forest Road village. The review of centres is schedule in Stage 3 of the Georges River LEP staged approach. 

3

Kingsgrove

 

This area is well serviced by Kingsgrove Rail Station. The station has the potential to be included in the Kogarah to Parramatta metro line in the future. This, and the possibility of the station to be part of a future transport hub, is not known at this time and any uplift should be supported by a masterplanning process with State and Local Government involvement as well as community stakeholders. 

 

The area is south of Kingsgrove Local Centre (which is zoned B2 Local Centre and shared with Bayside LGA) and Kingsgrove Industrial Centre (which is zoned IN1 and shared with Canterbury Bankstown LGA). It is currently zoned R2 Low Density Residential.

 

Parts of the area are identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. The area is also affected by the MSE Pipeline as it is within the Notification Zone.  

 

There are no heritage items, HCAs and only a limited number of strata titles in the area. 

  

The area has been ruled out of immediate rezoning/ uplifting because of the known deficiency of open space in this locality. 

 

Further, Kingsgrove is also identified as a Local Centre which will undergo a similar masterplanning process to the Mortdale Local Centre. Housing growth will be investigated in the future as part of a masterplan. The review of centres is scheduled for Stage 3 of the Georges River LEP staged approach. 

4

Penshurst / Mortdale

 

This area is serviced by both Penshurst and Mortdale Centres, and is adjacent to both these Rail Stations. It is adjacent to 2 existing R4 High Density Residential areas, to its north east and south west.

 

It has good access to existing educational facilities i.e. schools, and some access to recreational facilities i.e. open space.  

 

There are several heritage items and one Heritage Conservation Area within this precinct. 

  

Parts of the area are identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. Measures such as free boarding above the flood level will need to be implemented in future developments. 

 

The area is being investigated as part of the Mortdale Local Centre Masterplan. Work on this Masterplan has commenced and the outcomes of the Masterplan may inform a future amendment to the Georges River LEP. 

5

Oatley West

 

The Oatley West area is serviced by Oatley Rail Station, as well as Oatley Local Centre (zoned B1) and Oatley village (zoned B1). The area has good access to recreation resources i.e. local parks.  

 

The area has a limited number of heritage items, not located within a HCA.  

 

Parts of the area are identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. Measures such as free boarding above the flood level will need to be implemented in future developments. 

 

This area was not considered for immediate rezoning/ uplifting in LEP 2021 because it is partially sited within the existing FSPA. A review of the extent of the FSPA is currently underway, and is discussed separately in this report. 

 

Further, Oatley West is also identified as a Local Centre which will undergo a similar masterplanning process to the Mortdale Local Centre. Housing growth in the area will be investigated in the future as part of a masterplan, after the completion of the FSPA review.  

6

South Hurstville

 

Unlike the other 5 areas, the South Hurstville area is not supported by rail infrastructure. It has reasonable access to the existing South Hurstville Local Centre (Zoned B2), and limited access to educational facilities i.e. schools. Access to the local centre is to the east, via land zoned R3 Medium Density Residential.  

 

The area has good access to recreational opportunities i.e. local open space. The area is zoned R2 Low Density Residential. It has a rectangular lot configuration, and a lineal street grid; which is similar to the other areas.  

 

The area was not selected for immediate rezoing/uplift because of known land use conflicts, and resultant amenity impacts (reported by residents), caused by the adjoining Halstead Light Industrial Precinct.  

 

The draft LEP 2020 introduces a creative industries local provision within the IN2 zone which seeks to incentivise uses such as filmmakers, architects, graphic designers, etc to occupy the Industrial Precinct and bring in office premise-type land uses. This may alleviate the traffic and amenity impacts caused by the current light industry uses. Over time, the nature of the industrial area may change, and potentially reduce the existing amenity impacts; but this will be dependent on many factors, including market forces. Housing growth will be investigated in the future, but would only be considered when the existing amenity impacts have been appropriately managed. 

 

77.   In summary, the Narwee housing growth area has been selected as the preferred option for investigation as a Housing Investigation Area (“HIA”) to be accelerated in this LEP because of its existing access to a good level of infrastructure i.e. public transport, school education facilities, local open space opportunities, and commercial facilities. The preliminary traffic assessment that has been undertaken indicates no major transport issues to the uplift. 

78.   It should be noted that this area is located within the Notification Zone of the MSE Pipeline that runs through the northern portion of the LGA. However a hazard analysis is under preparation and will be submitted to DPIE with the request for a Gateway Determination. 

79.   The remaining 5 future housing growth areas will be reviewed as part of LEP 2025 and beyond in accordance with the LSPS 2040 Structure Plan. 

Existing Context

80.   Narwee precinct (refer Figures 3 and 4) has an approximate area of 6.5 hectares. It is located in the northern part of the LGA, approximately 350 metres south of the Narwee Rail Station and Public School (across Broad Arrow Road).

81.   The area is conveniently located between Narwee Primary School, Narwee Pre school, Rasdall Park, Narwee Park and Beverly Hills Girls High School. It is immediately south of the Narwee Local Centre. It adjoins R4 High Density Residential land to the north east. There is good access to other local parks nearby.  

82.   Rezoning for additional housing in this area in the future would provide the opportunity to create diversity in dwelling types, within walking distance to existing infrastructure. 

 


 

Figure 3 – Existing aerial map (red outline of Narwee HIA)

 

Figure 4 – Existing zoning map (draft LEP 2020) with adjoining Canterbury-Bankstown LEP

 


 

Table 2 – Narwee HIA Existing Precinct Information

Approximate site area

62,500sqm

Number of existing dwellings

109 dwellings

Existing zoning

(under GRLEP 2020)

R2 Low Density Residential

Adjoining zonings

R2 Low Density Residential

R3 Medium Density Residential (Canterbury-Bankstown LGA)

B2 Local Centre

RE1 Public Recreation

Street network

Despite being local streets, Mercury Street and Chamberlain Street are wide and are able to accommodate on-street parking on both sides of the street as well as two-way carriageways. Berrille Road, however, is narrower with only one lane of carriageway and on-street parking on both sides of the street. Berrille Road also takes on a cul-de-sac character due to its U-shaped layout.

Subdivision Pattern

Fairly consistent with two main types –

 

Mercury Street / Chamberlain Street street block:

Average lot width – 13m to 15m

Average lot size – 630sqm to 810sqm

 

Berrille Road area:

Average lot width – less than 13m

Average lot size – 420sqm

Current built form

A mix of single and double storey brick and weatherboard dwelling houses. Generally older dwelling stock, with only a few new developments scattered in the area.

Surrounding land uses and built form

The Narwee HIA is adjoined to the north by an existing area of high density residential area on Bryant Street comprising of predominately red brick walk-ups (three to four storeys). The Narwee village (zoned B2, shared with Canterbury-Bankstown Council) is also located to the north of the HIA. Rasdall Park and a series of existing villa developments border the HIA to the east. The low density areas to the south feature a mix of single brick and weatherboard dwellings. The former Narwee High School redevelopment is located to the west of the HIA. This area is characterised by two storey dwellings that visually appear as townhouses and terraces due to the medium density of these developments. Narwee Park is also located to the west of the HIA.

Ownership patterns

Predominately private ownership. There are 2 sites owned by public authorities:

·    80 Mercury Street

·    5 Bryant Street

 

83.   The photos in Figures 5 – 8 below exemplify the generally low scale, low density established residential character of the area.

 


 

Figure 5 – Typical older style dwelling houses on Balfour Road

 

 

Figure 6 - View from Mercury Street

 

Figure 7 - View of Chamberlain Street

Figure 8 - View of B2 Local Centre zone interface on Chamberlain Street

84.   With consideration of the guiding principles outlined above, the detailed selection rationale for the Narwee HIA is provided in Table 3 below. 

 

Table 3 – Narwee HIA Selection Rationale 

Public Transport 

Narwee train station is within 350m of the precinct on the T8 line, with train services to and from the city (Central station) via the Airport every 15 minutes. Buses depart from Narwee to Hurstville, Bankstown, and other local suburbs, including Roselands Shopping Centre.   

 

Beverly Hills train station is within 850m of the precinct also serviced by the T8 line. Buses depart from Beverly Hills to Strathfield, Hurstville, Rockdale and other local suburbs, including Roselands Shopping Centre.   

Shops and Services 

Narwee local centre adjoins this precinct. The centre offers a broad range of retail and commercial services for the local community and visitors.  The centre extends across both northern and southern sides of the station. Broad Arrow Road forms the boundary with Canterbury Bankstown Council, with the southern side of the road being within the Georges River LGA. The northern part of the centre is located within the Canterbury Bankstown LGA.  

 

Riverwood local centre and Roselands Shopping Centre are both located approximately 1500m from the precinct.  

Educational Establishments 

Seven schools located within a kilometre: Narwee Public School, Beverly Hills Girls High School and Intensive English School, Regina Coeli Catholic Primary School, Beverly Hills Public School, Beverly Hills North Public School and Peakhurst Public School and Hannans Road Public School. 

Community Facilities 

Eight childcare centres are located within a kilometre.  

Riverwood Library and Knowledge Centre and Riverwood Early Childhood Health located within 1600 metres of the precinct. 

Open Space 

Rasdall Park and Narwee Park adjoin the precinct. Ten parks are located within a kilometre including Olds Park on Forest road. 

Environmental Constraints 

The eastern side of Berrille Road is identified as being flood affected by the Hurstville Overland Flow Study. Measures such as freeboarding above the flood level will need to be implemented in future developments.  

 

There are no other known environmental constraints affecting the precinct. However, the precinct is located within the buffer zone of the Moomba to Sydney Ethane (MSE) Pipeline that runs through the northern portion of the LGA. A Hazard Analysis Report is being prepared to identify the potential risk impacts from the future proposed development with an upper limit of 400 additional dwellings as well as recommendations for proposed mitigation measures that may be required to mitigate the impacts of development. 

Heritage 

There are no heritage items or heritage conservation areas within or adjacent to the precinct.  

Transition 

The proposed zones of R3 and R4 zone with maximum heights of 9m and 12 m, respectively, will provide a transition down to the adjoining R2 low density residential areas. 

Proposed Zoning and Controls

Table 4 – Narwee HIA Proposed Precinct Information 

Estimated potential yield 

420 dwellings 

(109 existing and an additional 311 dwellings)  

Existing zoning and controls 

(under GRLEP 2020) 

R2 Low Density Residential  

Height – 9m 

FSR – 0.55:1 

Proposed zoning and controls  

R3 Medium Density Residential  

Height – 9m 

FSR – 0.7:1 

R4 High Density Residential 

Height – 13m 

FSR – 1:1 

Proposed built form 

R3 Medium Density Residential – 

One and two storey dual occupancies, manor houses, terraces, villas and townhouses. 

 

R4 High Density Residential – 

Small apartment blocks of a maximum of four storeys. 

 

85.   The proposed LEP maps are provided below in Figures 9 - 11

 


 

Figure 9 – Proposed Zoning Map

 

 

Figure 10 – Proposed Height of Buildings Map

 


 

Figure 11 – Proposed Floor Space Ratio Map


Proposed Built Form – R4 High Density Residential

86.   The street block bounded by Chamberlain Street, Mercury Street and Balfour Road as well as No.5 and 7 Bryant Street are proposed to be rezoned to the R4 High Density Residential zone. Residential flat buildings are the prevailing development typology in the R4 zone. 

87.   When the Planning Proposal was referred to the LPP for their advice at the meeting dated 29 October 2020, a maximum building height of 12m and FSR of 1:1 was proposed to be applied to the R4 zoned areas within this precinct. However, LPP raised concerns regarding the viability of the 12m height limit with respect to utilising the maximum 1:1 FSR and achieving a built form outcome which is compliant with the Apartment Design Guide (“ADG”).

88.   The ADG requires a 3.1m floor to floor height, which would mean a 4 storey built form will be 12.4m in overall building height. The original proposed height limit of 12m is likely to lead to a built form outcome that exceeds the height plane control as demonstrated by Figure 12 below.

 


 

Figure 12 - 3D visualisation of potential built form in the proposed R4 zone

89.   Accordingly, the LPP resolved to amend the proposed maximum building height from 12m to 13m in the R4 zoned areas in the Narwee HIA to enable residential flat building developments of four storeys in order to assist in achieving ADG compliance, obviating the need for variations to the height control and to deliver compatible built form outcomes.

90.   Furthermore, to ensure consistency with all proposed R4 zones across the LGA, a 1,000sqm minimum lot size will apply to this precinct for the purpose of preventing the fragmentation of land to ensure large parcels of land are available for development outcomes that are compatible with the high density zone. 

91.   The existing subdivision pattern in the proposed R4 zoned areas features an average lot size of approx. 650sqm. Redevelopment is considered to be feasible as only two allotments are required for amalgamation to meet the 1,000sqm minimum lot size control. 

92.   The proposed development standards for the R4 zone are summarised in Table 5 below:

Table 5 - Proposed development standards in the proposed R4 zone

Development Standard 

Proposed Control 

Zone 

R4 High Density Residential 

Height 

13m 

FSR 

1:1 

Minimum lot size  

1,000sqm 

 

93.   Built form analysis (refer Figure 12 above) prepared for Council demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed development standards for this precinct. Apartment Design Guide controls such as building height, building setback development controls have been applied to assist in the visualisation of the potential development outcome. 

Proposed Built Form – R3 Medium Density Residential

94.   The remainder of the HIA is proposed to be rezoned to the R3 Medium Density Residential zone to facilitate the provision of greater housing choice and diversity in the LGA through the creation of ‘true’ medium density zoned areas. Developments such as multi dwelling housing, terraces and manor houses are the prevailing development typologies in the R3 zone.

95.   Medium density developments are considered to be a more appropriate response in the areas fronting Berrille Road to ensure any potential conflict between vehicles and pedestrians are minimised in light of the narrow, cul-de-sac nature of Berrille Road.  

96.   A consistent set of development controls have been developed for all R3 zones across the LGA.

The proposed development standards for the R3 zone are summarised in Table 6 below: 

Table 6 - Proposed development standards in the proposed R3 zone  

Development Standard 

Proposed Control 

Zone 

R3 Medium Density Residential 

Height 

9m 

FSR 

0.7:1 

Minimum lot size  

800sqm 

 

97.   The existing subdivision pattern in the proposed R3 zoned areas features an average lot size of approx. 420sqm. Redevelopment is considered to be feasible as only two allotments are required for amalgamation to meet the 800sqm minimum lot size control. 

98.   Built form analysis prepared for Council demonstrates the indicative building envelope of these medium density developments. Existing DCP controls such as building setback distances have been applied as parameters to assist with visualisation (refer Figures 13 to 15). 

Figure 13 - 3D visualisation of potential multi dwelling housing built form in the R3 zone


 

Figure 14 - 3D visualisation of potential manor house built form in the R3 zone

 

 

Figure 15 - 3D visualisation of potential terrace built form in the R3 zone

 

 

 

Traffic Findings

99.   The proposed upzoning of the Narwee HIA will be supported by a Traffic Report for the purposes of: 

·        Establishing the existing traffic capacity in the local road network of each HIA 

·        Identifying existing traffic issues and capacity constraints within the local road   network 

·        Identifying the additional traffic generation resulting from the proposed rezoning 

·        Assessing any potential traffic impacts resulting from the additional traffic 

·        Recommending mitigation measures to alleviate the potential traffic impacts. 

100. A preliminary traffic analysis (refer Attachment 8) was conducted for the precinct to determine the post-development traffic impacts using an exaggerated take up of 400 additional dwellings. 

101. Overall, the preliminary analysis identifies that the Narwee HIA benefits from proximity to the M5 Motorway, which interconnects with M8 Motorway. This enables notable alleviation of traffic from the local road network. 

102. Furthermore, the proposed upzoning can be accommodated with no undue difficulty as the post-development traffic modelling demonstrates an acceptable level of service can be maintained at the nearby intersections. A minor intervention to the existing local road network is recommended as follows: 

Narwee precinct will only require one treatment, being a no right turn restriction (sign) from Mercury Street to Stoney Creek Road in the PM peak period.

103. A final Traffic Report is currently being prepared with the inclusion of a number of additional intersections (including those located in the Canterbury-Bankstown LGA) as follows to enable a comprehensive review of the potential traffic impacts: 

·        Broadarrow Road / King Georges Road (Canterbury-Bankstown LGA) 

·        Broadarrow Road / Bryan Street under the railway bridge 

·        Edgbaston Road / Mercury Street 

·        Edgbaston Road / Penshurst Street 

·        Stoney Creek Road / King Georges Road 

104. The full Traffic Report will be publicly exhibited with this Planning Proposal following the receipt of a Gateway Determination. 

MANOR HOUSES AND MULTI DWELLING HOUSING (TERRACES)

Background - Low Rise Medium Density Housing Code 

105. In the original Planning Proposal for the draft LEP 2020 which was submitted to DPIE requesting a Gateway Determination, Council proposed to introduce the land use terms of ‘manor houses’ and ‘multi dwelling housing (terraces)’ into the comprehensive LEP in preparation for the commencement of the Low Rise Medium Density Housing Code (LRMDHC). 

106. Under the LRMDHC, manor houses will become permissible as complying development where multi dwelling housing or residential flat buildings (or both) are permitted. Similarly, terraces will become permissible as complying development where multi dwelling housing developments are permitted. 

107. The complying development process allows development to be approved with minimal neighbour notification and no requirement for objections to be considered. 

108. At the time of the LRMDHC’s announcement, multi dwelling housing was a permitted land use under the Hurstville LEP 2012 in all R2 Low Density Residential zones while multi dwelling housing was prohibited in the R2 zones under the Kogarah LEP 2012. The permissibility of multi dwelling housing in the R2 zones of the former Hurstville LGA threatened the neighbourhood amenity and character of these low density suburbs due to the imminent introduction of the LRMDHC across the LGA. 

109. At its meeting on 28 May 2018, Council acknowledged the serious concern that the LRMDHC will generate for the neighbourhood amenity and character of these R2 areas and resolved to remove the permissibility of multi dwelling housing from the R2 zones as part of a planning proposal known as the LRMDHC Planning Proposal. 

110. On 6 December 2019, the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces made the plan and the following amendments proposed by the LRMDHC Planning Proposal came into effect through the Georges River Local Environmental Plan Amendment (Miscellaneous) 2019

Hurstville LEP 2012

·        Prohibit multi dwelling housing in the R2 Low Density Residential zone

·        Increase the minimum lot size for dual occupancies under Area G from 630sqm to 650sqm 

Kogarah LEP 2012

·        Repeal Items 17 and 18 of Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses

111. In the DPIE’s endorsement of the LRMDHC Planning Proposal, it was specified that Council’s Local Housing Strategy is required to outline the approach for the delivery of a sufficient number of dwellings to meet housing demand while ensuring a supply of a range of housing styles to promote choice and diversity. 

112. To support the removal of medium density housing from the low density residential zones as result of the LRMDHC Planning Proposal, Council has committed to the following as part of the Local Housing Strategy

·        Review of all residential zoned land in the LGA to determine the areas that have merit on strategic planning grounds to accommodate medium density housing; and

·        Develop planning controls and development standards for medium density housing that are responsive to the local character of the LGA.

Background - GRLEP 2020 

113. The draft LEP 2020 sought to develop a clear hierarchy of residential density to ensure development typologies reflect the objectives and name of the respective zone: 

·        Low density: dwelling houses and dual occupancies 

·        Medium density: attached dwellings, multi dwelling housing, terraces and manor houses 

·        High density: residential flat buildings

114. To further strength the hierarchy of residential zones, the draft LEP 2020 also sought to introduce minimum lot size and minimum lot width development standards for all medium density typologies with the intent of reinforcing a consistent desired future character across the LGA’s medium density zones. The proposed controls are outlined in Table 7 below: 

 

Table 7 – Existing and proposed controls for medium density residential developments

 

Development Standard

HLEP 2012

KLEP 2012

GRLEP 2020

Minimum lot size

945sqm

(multi dwelling housing) (Hurstville DCP No.1)

800sqm

(multi dwelling housing)

800sqm

Minimum lot width -attached dwellings

15m

(Hurstville DCP No.1)

20m

(Kogarah DCP)

21m

Minimum lot width - manor houses

N/A

N/A

18m

Minimum lot width - multi dwelling housing

15m

(Hurstville DCP No.1)

20m

(Kogarah DCP)

18m

Minimum lot width - multi dwelling housing (terraces)

N/A

N/A

21m

Height of buildings

9m

9m

9m

Floor space ratio

0.6:1

0.7:1

0.7:1

 

115. The draft LEP 2020 sought to adopt the 800sqm minimum lot size for all medium density developments as there has been no recorded Clause 4.6 variation to this development standard under KLEP 2012 since the implementation of this control in 2017 which demonstrates the viability and feasibility of this requirement. It is anticipated that the implementation of this control, as opposed to adopting the 945sqm requirement under the Hurstville DCP No.1, will facilitate the delivery of more medium density housing across the LGA which will in turn assist in providing more housing choice and diversity. 

116. With regards to the minimum lot width requirement, design analysis conducted as part of the draft LEP 2020 identified that a 15m wide lot is too narrow to accommodate a driveway along one side boundary and private open space for the multi dwelling units along the opposite side boundary. Therefore, an 18m lot width requirement is proposed to provide a desirable development outcome. 

117. To ensure flexibility is provided for the community and the development industry to deliver various medium density residential typologies based on market demand and the local context, the 18m minimum lot width was also proposed to be applied to manor houses. 

118. A greater minimum lot width of 21m was proposed for attached dwellings and multi dwelling housing (terraces) due to the requirement for these typologies to have all dwellings facing the street. A 21m lot width provides for 3 dwellings of 6m wide each as well as 1.5m side setbacks along both side boundaries. 

119. The above controls tabulated in Table 7 were supported by the LPP as the planning proposal authority at its meeting dated 6 February 2020. 

120. However, as part of the Gateway Determination issued by DPIE on 10 March 2020 (refer Attachment 3), Council was instructed to remove all references and proposed provisions, including development standards, relating to the LRMDHC land uses of ‘manor houses’ and ‘terraces’ from the draft LEP 2020. Accordingly, the draft LEP 2020 was submitted to the DPIE for finalisation on 30 June 2020 without any references to the LRMDHC land uses. 

Background - Codes SEPP 

121. On 1 July 2020, the LRMDHC came into effect in the LGA under the revised name of the Low Rise Housing Diversity Code (“LRHDC”), which allows dual occupancies, manor houses and multi dwelling housing (terraces) to be carried out as complying developments. 

122. In addition to its permissibility as a form of complying development, manor houses are also granted the additional under the relevant LEP afforded by Clause 3B.1A of the State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 (“Codes SEPP”): 

State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 - Division 1A Manor houses permitted in certain land use zones 

Clause 3B.1A   Development for the purposes of manor houses 

Manor houses are, despite any other environmental planning instrument, permitted with consent on land in any of the following land use zones if multi dwelling housing or residential flat buildings (or both) are permitted in the zone— 

(a)  Zone RU5 Village, 

(b)  Zone R1 General Residential, 

(c)  Zone R2 Low Density Residential, 

(d)  Zone R3 Medium Density Residential.  

123. Given that ‘multi dwelling housing’ is a permissible land use within the R3 Medium Density Residential zone within the existing LEPs and the draft LEP 2020, development applications can be lodged for manor house developments utilising the development standards stipulated by the LEP. 

124. However, the same LEP permissibility has not been afforded to multi dwelling housing (terraces). This specific development typology must be carried out as complying development under the provisions of the Codes SEPP. 

Proposed LEP2021 Amendments 

125. The inconsistencies of the recently introduced LRHDC are likely to result in uncertainty for both the community and the development sector due to the variations between the Codes SEPP and the LEP with regards to maximum building height, floor space ratio (“FSR”) and minimum lot size. 

126. The absence of development standards to regulate manor houses and the impermissibility of multi dwelling housing (terraces) within the LEP requires urgent rectification. 

127. Furthermore, the application of the minimum 600sqm lot size for manor houses and terraces as prescribed by the Codes SEPP is likely to result in a density which is incongruent with the existing density and character of the LGA’s medium density zones. This is considered to be inconsistent with the aspirations of the Georges River community. 

128. Accordingly, this Planning Proposal seeks to promote the delivery of housing choice across the LGA by re-introducing the following amendments: 

·        Permit ‘manor houses’ and ‘multi dwelling housing (terraces)’ across all R3 Medium Density Residential and R4 High Density Residential zones;

·        Implement minimum lot size of 800sqm and lot width of 18m for manor houses to ensure consistency with multi dwelling housing for flexible market up-take; and

·        Implement minimum lot size of 800sqm and lot width of 21m for multi dwelling housing (terraces) to enable appropriate subdivision patterns and viable development outcomes.

129. It should be noted that although manor houses are permissible in the LEP under Clause 3B.1A of the Codes SEPP, the community and the development industry would greatly benefit from the certainty and clarity enabled by the explicit nomination of manor houses in the LEP’s Land Use Table. 

130. This amendment is considered to be consistent with Council’s existing approach of nominating the permissibility of ‘secondary dwellings’ within the LGA’s residential zones within the draft LEP 2020, despite the provisions of Clause 20 under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 which permits secondary dwellings in LEPs where dwelling houses are permissible: 

State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 - Division 2 Secondary dwellings 

Clause 20   Land to which Division applies 

This Division applies to land within any of the following land use zones or within a land use zone that is equivalent to any of those zones, but only if development for the purposes of a dwelling house is permissible on the land— 

(a)  Zone R1 General Residential, 

(b)  Zone R2 Low Density Residential, 

(c)  Zone R3 Medium Density Residential, 

(d)  Zone R4 High Density Residential, 

(e)  Zone R5 Large Lot Residential. 

131. Currently, the KLEP 2012 currently relies on the provisions of the above clause to enable the permissibility of secondary dwellings in the residential zones. However, Council has received many complaints from both the industry professionals and property owners regarding the confusion caused by the absence of ‘secondary dwellings’ from the KLEP 2012 Land Use Tables.  

132. In addition to the certainty that will be enabled by this Planning Proposal’s inclusion of manor houses and terraces into the LEP land use table, LEP21 also provides increased development potential as demonstrated by the comparison of proposed LEP controls against the Codes SEPP controls in Table 8 below: 

Table 8 – Proposed LEP21 controls vs Codes SEPP controls

 

Codes SEPP

Draft LEP 2021

Manor houses

Permissibility

Zone R3 - multi dwelling housing or residential flat buildings (or both) are permitted.

Zone R3 and Zone R4

Minimum lot size

Whichever is greater –

600sqm or the minimum lot area specified for manor houses in the respective LEP (800sqm)

800sqm

Minimum lot width

15m

18m

Maximum building height

8.5m

9m

Maximum FSR

Maximum GFA is 25% of the lot area plus 150sqm, to a maximum of 400sqm.

 

For example on 800sqm site, the resulting FSR is 0.42:1 (350sqm GFA).

Zone R3 – 0.7:1 FSR

For example of 800sqm site, the resulting GFA is 560sqm (210sqm greater than the Codes SEPP).

Sample built form

Multi dwelling housing (terraces)

Permissibility

In Zone R3 as complying development only.

Zone R3 and Zone R4

Minimum lot size

Whichever is greater –

600sqm or the minimum lot area specified for terraces in the respective LEP (800sqm)

800sqm

Minimum lot width

21m

21m

Maximum building height

9m

9m

Maximum FSR

0.8:1 FSR

 

0.7:1 FSR

Built form

133. As demonstrated by Table 8 above, this Planning Proposal will enable the delivery of ‘true’ medium density dwellings across the LGA by increasing development yield for manor house developments under the LEP while formalising terraces as development applications. 

134. It should be noted that the dwelling size of manor house units specified by the Codes SEPP (refer Figure 16) are identical to the apartment sizes nominated by the Apartment Design Guide (refer Figure 17). Despite the LRHDC’s permissibility of manor houses as a form of low to medium density typology through complying development, the combination of the restrictive GFA and the dwelling sizes is likely to result in apartment products with reduced amenity in areas that are less accessible than the high density zones. 

Figure 16 – Extract from Low Rise Housing Diversity Design Guide – Manor House

 

Figure 17 – Extract from Apartment Design Guide – 4D Apartment Size and Layout

 

135. Accordingly, the additional GFA provided through LEP controls for manor house developments will promote the provision of true’ medium density dwellings. For example on a 800sqm site, a manor house with 4 dwellings of 140sqm each can be provided through the application of LEP controls while the Codes SEPP can only provide 4 dwellings of 87.5sqm each. 

136. It is evident that the LEP provides almost double the development capacity provided by the Codes SEPP, which will more adequately respond to the community’s housing demands for more medium density housing options as identified by the Local Housing Strategy

137. Furthermore, the proposed introduction of the multi dwelling housing (terraces) land use creates opportunities to provide a diverse choice of high quality housing across the LGA as the permissibility of this dwelling typology will no longer be restricted to only complying developments. 

138. The proposed 800sqm minimum lot size requirement for manor houses and terraces is consistent with the development standard applied to the other medium density typologies of multi dwelling housing and attached dwellings under the draft GRLEP 2020. This will ensure the clear hierarchy of residential zones is upheld across the LGA as follows: 

·        Low density – minimum 650sqm lot size for dual occupancies 

·        Medium density – minimum 800sqm lot size for multi dwelling housing, terraces, manor houses and attached dwellings 

·        High density – minimum 1,000sqm lot size for residential flat buildings 

Analysis of Development Potential

139. Consideration has also been given towards the feasibility of manor house developments in light of the increased minimum lot size of 800sqm and lot width of 18m proposed by this Planning Proposal as compared to the Codes SEPP controls of 600sqm and 15m respectively. 

140. There are a total of 15 R3 zoned precincts across the LGA, including the proposed rezoning of the Narwee HIA. A desktop analysis has been conducted for each precinct with considerations of the existing lot size and lot width of the properties that are likely to be redeveloped for medium density developments and in particular, feasibility for manor houses utilising the proposed LEP21 controls. The findings of the analysis are provided in Table 9 below: 

Table 9 – Feasibility of LEP21 manor house controls

Precinct

Analysis

1.  North and West of Peakhurst Park – Peakhurst

This precinct is proposed to be rezoned from R2 to R3 by the draft GRLEP 2020 and has a limited number of existing strata-titled properties. 

  

There are two prevailing types of subdivision pattern – 

·      760sqm lot size with 13.5m lot width 

·      590sqm lot size with 15m lot width 

  

Site amalgamation is required to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

2.  Apsley Estate – Penshurst

This precinct is proposed to be rezoned from R2 to R3 by the draft GRLEP 2020 and only contains one existing strata-titled property. 

  

Despite the variation in lot size, there is a consistent subdivision pattern featuring a 12.5m lot width. 

  

Site amalgamation is required to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

3.  Ada Street / Rosa Street – Oatley

Title: Inserting image...

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and has a limited number of existing strata-titled properties. 

  

There is a lack of prevailing subdivision pattern but the following relationships can be observed: 

·      Lots with areas of >650sqm have lot widths of 18m or greater 

·      Lots with areas of <650sqm have lot widths of less than 14m 

  

Site amalgamation is required for the smaller sites to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP21 controls. 

4.  King Georges Road – South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and has a limited number of existing strata-titled properties. 

  

There are two prevailing types of subdivision pattern – 

·      Lots fronting King Georges Road has 12m lot width and lot sizes of 300sqm to 700sqm 

·      Lots fronting the perpendicular streets have consistent lot widths of 15m with 690sqm lot size 

  

Site amalgamation is required for the smaller sites to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. Although lots fronting the perpendicular streets may be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP, recent development activity in the South Hurstville area demonstrates a preference for multi dwelling housing developments on larger lots. The existing development potential is unlikely to be reduced under the proposed LEP controls. 

5.  Culwulla Street – South Hurstville

Title: Inserting image...

This precinct is proposed to be rezoned from R2 to R3 by the draft GRLEP 2020 and has no existing strata-titled properties. 

  

There is a prevailing subdivision pattern of 650sqm lot size and 15m lot width. 

  

Although most of the allotments within this precinct may be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP, recent development activity in the South Hurstville area demonstrates a preference for multi dwelling housing developments on larger lots. The existing development potential is unlikely to be reduced under the proposed LEP controls. 

6.  Rickard Road / Connells Point Road – South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

7.  Rowe Street – South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to be rezoned from R2 to R3 by the draft GRLEP 2020 and only contains one existing strata-titled property. 

  

There is a lack of prevailing subdivision pattern but the following relationships can be observed: 

·      The smaller lots have site areas of less than 600sqm and have 12m lot widths 

·      The larger lots are 1,000sqm in site area and have lot widths of 20m 

  

Site amalgamation is required for the smaller sites to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

 

8.  Morshead Drive – South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

  

9.  The Mall – South Hurstville

Title: Inserting image...

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

10. Blakesley Road – South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and half of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

The remaining sites have a consistent subdivision pattern with site area of less than 500sqm and lot widths of 10m. 

  

Site amalgamation is required to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

11. Cooleen / Walton Street – Blakehurst

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

12. Betts Avenue – Blakehurst

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

  

13. St Georges Parade / George Street – Allawah / South Hurstville

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

14. Rocky Point Road – Sans Souci

This precinct is proposed to remain as an R3 zone under draft GRLEP 2020 and the majority of properties are already strata-titled townhouses and villas. 

  

Due to the developed status of this precinct, there will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

15. Berrille Road – Narwee

This precinct is proposed to be rezoned from R2 to R3 and R4 by this Planning Proposal as part of the Narwee HIA and does not contain any strata-titled properties. 

  

The existing subdivision pattern in the proposed R3 zoned areas features an average lot size of approx. 420sqm with 13m lot widths. 

  

Site amalgamation is required to be eligible for manor house developments under the Codes SEPP. There will be no loss of development potential under the proposed LEP controls. 

DCP Controls 

141. It should be noted that a draft Georges River Development Control Plan (“DCP”) 2020 has been prepared to support the draft LEP 2020. At its meeting dated 17 September 2020, the LPP resolved to place the draft DCP 2020 on public exhibition. The draft DCP will be on exhibition until 27 November 2020. 

142. Part 6.2 of the draft DCP 2020 contains all the relevant controls pertaining to medium density development including multi dwelling housing, multi dwelling housing (terraces) and manor houses. 

143. The introduction of manor houses and multi dwelling housing (terraces) into the Georges River LEP will be supported by the proposed draft DCP 2020 controls.

MAPPING ANOMALIES

144. Following a review of the maps for the finalisation of draft LEP 2020, two mapping errors have been identified in the Height of Buildings Map and Floor Space Ratio Map. These two errors were previously considered by LPP during the finalisation of the draft LEP 2020. 

33 Dora Street, Hurstville 

145. This site is zoned B4 – Mixed Use and is located at the edge of Hurstville Centre adjoining Waratah Private Hospital. The site contains a semi-detached Victorian terrace that forms part of a group heritage listing for a row of Victorian Terraces being Nos.33-47 Dora St, Hurstville (under draft GRLEP2020). This group of terraces and the adjoining site at No.49 Dora Street have a maximum floor space ratio of 3:1. 

146. The Height of Buildings Map in draft LEP 2020 indicates a maximum permissible height of 30m for 33 Dora Street, Hurstville as shown in Figure 21 below. 

Figure 21 – Extract of the draft GRLEP 2020 Height of Buildings Map for 33 Dora Street, Hurstville (outlined in red) 

 

147. This mapping anomaly was identified during the preparation of LEP 2020. The height was corrected from 30m to 15m and included in the exhibition version of the draft Height of Buildings Map. However this correction was not explicitly stated and the property owner did not receive a targeted letter. During the finalisation of the LEP 2020, the LPP resolved that the existing height for 33 Dora Street be re-instated to 30 metres prior to being forwarded to the DPIE for gazettal.

148. The Height of Buildings Map is proposed to be amended for the 33 Dora Street, Hurstville from 30m to 15m to rectify an existing anomaly, to correspond with the adjoining sites at Nos.35-49 Dora Street being 15m. 

199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate 

149. This site contains a split zoning of B2 – Local Centre and R4 – High Density Residential and is located within Ramsgate Centre, as shown in Figure 22 below. The site contains a two-storey shop top housing with vehicular access from Rocky Point Road.

Figure 22 – Extract of the draft GRLEP2020 Land Use Zoning Map for 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate (outlined in white) 

 

150. The Height of Buildings Map in draft GRLEP2020 indicates a maximum permissible height of 21 metres for across the entire site as shown in Figure 23 below.

Figure 23 – Extract of the draft GRLEP 2020 Height of Buildings Map for 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate (outlined in white) 

 

151. The Floor Space Ratio Map in draft GRLEP2020 indicates a maximum permissible floor space ratio of 2.5:1 for across the entire site as shown in Figure 24 below. 

Figure 24 – Extract of the draft GRLEP 2020 Floor Space Ratio Map for 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate (outlined in white)

152. This mapping anomaly was identified during the preparation of LEP 2020. The height and FSR were corrected to be split on the site to correspond with the remainder of the street block in the exhibited draft LEP 2020 maps. However this correction was not explicitly stated and the property owner did not receive a targeted letter. During the finalisation of the draft LEP 2020, the LPP resolved that the existing height and floor space ratio for 199 Rocky Point Road be re-instated to 30m prior to being forwarded to the DPIE for gazettal. 

153. To rectify this mapping anomaly, the following amendments are proposed for 199 Rocky Point Road, Ramsgate: 

·        The Height of Buildings Map to be amended from 21m to 15m and 21m; and  

·        The Floor Space Ratio Map to be amended from 2.5:1 to 1.5:1 and 2.5:1. 

MONARO AVENUE OPEN SPACE

Background 

154. The Planning Proposal for draft LEP 2020 had originally proposed to include the acquisition of 6 properties located at 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove in response to the LSPS 2040 vision to deliver additional open space across the LGA. 

155. The subject properties make up half of the eastern street block surrounding Peter Lowe Reserve (refer Figure 18 below). 

Figure 18 – Location of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove

156. The acquisition of these properties would have enabled an expansion of the Peter Lowe Reserve, which is currently affected by a number of physical limitations including: 

·        Landlocked by residential dwellings on all three sides; 

·        Poor visibility to the general public; 

·        Reduced accessibility to the general public as result of poor visibility; 

·        Accessed via three narrow laneways on Monaro Avenue, New England Drive and Kinsel Avenue; 

·        Narrow laneways limits usage by the broader community; 

·        Experiences little to no passive surveillance from public streets; and 

·        Relies on active surveillance from the rear of 36 houses. 

157. Peter Lowe Reserve is located in the suburb of Kingsgrove, which is located in the northern portion of the LGA. Council’s Open Space, Recreation and Community Facilities Strategy 2019 – 2036 identifies a 76,000sqm (or 7.6ha) shortage of active open space in the LGA, particularly in the north of the LGA in suburbs like Beverly Hills, Kingsgrove, Narwee and Riverwood. 

158. Based on a desktop analysis of the total amount of open space in each Ward (refer Table 10 below), the Hurstville Ward located at the north-eastern corner of the LGA, which comprises of the suburbs of Beverly Hills, Hurstville (north of the railway line) and Kingsgrove, has the least amount of open space available to its residents, which is closely followed by the Mortdale Ward comprising of the suburbs of Mortdale, Narwee and Penshurst.

Table 10 – Breakdown of Open Space by Ward 

Ward 

Blakehurst 

Hurstville 

Kogarah Bay 

Mortdale 

Peakhurst 

Area of Open Space (ha) 

124.93 

26.14 

57.76 

29.99 

235.37 

Approx. Number of Dwellings 

9,778 

11,819 

13,553 

10,287 

9,355 

Open Space per Dwelling (sqm) 

127.77 

22.12 

42.62 

29.15 

251.60 

% of Total Open Space 

26.3% 

5.5% 

12.2% 

6.3% 

49.6% 

 

159. The Hurstville Ward is also the Ward with the smallest amount of open space available per dwelling with only 22.12sqm of open space available compared to the average open space provision rate of approximately 76.68sqm per dwelling across the LGA. Furthermore, only 5.5% of the total amount of open space in the LGA is accommodated within this Ward. 

160. Accordingly, the expansion of Peter Lowe Reserve would enable the creation of additional open space in an area of the LGA with a significant shortage of both active and passive recreation areas. 

161. However, during the public exhibition of the draft LEP 2020 from 1 April to 31 May 2020 (inclusive), a total of 163 submissions were received objecting to the acquisition of 11-21 Monaro Avenue due to concerns regarding the compulsory acquisition process and the amenity impacts associated with more users for this park. The key issues raised in these objections are summarised as follows: 

·        Acquisition for open space is not justified as the Reserve is not near existing or proposed high density areas;

·        It is a poor investment of Council funds;

·        Places stress on owners of properties proposed for acquisition;

·        Will result in increased traffic and crime rates as more people will visit the Reserve; and

·        There are no plans for the park to indicate how the park will be used.

162. To address the concerns raised by the submissions in relation to the FSPA, the LPP at its meeting dated 25 and 26 June 2020 made the amendments to remove the land reservation acquisition of 11-21 Monaro Avenue from the draft LEP 2020. 

163. However, further investigation was requested by the LPP in its recommendation: 

3. The Panel notes the existing need for additional open space in the northern portion of the Local Government Area and encourages the Council to continue to pursue and investigate all opportunities to provide such open space including the provision of additional land in the vicinity of Peter Lowe Reserve as part of the preparation of the draft Local Environmental Plan in 2021/2022.

Negotiated Purchase of Properties

164. Table 10 above indicates a deficiency of available open space in the northern portion of the LGA particularly in the Hurstville Ward. The key principle of achieving equity across the LGA requires Council to further pursue and investigate opportunities to provide additional open space in this locality. 

165. In accordance with the LPP’s recommendation, Council staff sought expressions of interest from the landowners in the immediate vicinity of Peter Lowe Reserve regarding the opportunity for Council to purchase their property for the purpose of expanding the Reserve. 

166. Council staff have had some success in negotiating the purchase of 15 Monaro Avenue (refer Figure 19 below). Subsequently, Council at its meeting dated 26 October 2020 resolved to purchase 15 Monaro Avenue for the purpose of converting the residential zoned land to public open space which will enable the expansion of the existing Peter Lowe Reserve.

167. Council is in the process of finalising the purchase of this property.

 

Figure 19 – 15 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove

 


 

LPP Consideration of Proposed Rezoning

168. In light of the successful negotiated outcome at 15 Monaro Avenue, an Addendum Report was presented to the LPP at its meeting dated 29 October 2020 seeking to include 11-21 Monaro Avenue (refer Figure 18 above) on the Land Reservation (“LRA”) Map as land to be reserved for the purpose of Local Open Space (RE1) and to rezone these properties from the existing R2 Low Density Residential zone to RE1 Public Recreation with this Planning Proposal. Refer Attachment 6 for the Addendum Report.

169. The intent of the inclusion of 11-21 Monaro Avenue on the LRA Map was to ensure the future expansion of Peter Lowe Reserve at a location that will provide direct visual sight lines from a public street (McGregor Street) to the largest portion of the park. The inclusion of these properties on the LRA Map will also allow development contributions to be utilised as a funding source for the purchase of these properties.

170. The subject properties have been selected for acquisition for the purpose of expanding the existing Reserve and are identified as the most appropriate due to the following reasons:

·        Direct visual sight lines will be provided to the largest portion of the park from a public street (McGregor Street) which is consistent with the four Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (“CPTED”) principles:

o   surveillance

o   access control

o   territorial reinforcement

o   space management

·        Promotes physical connectivity between the public domain and the Reserve by increasing the entry point from a narrow laneway to a wide street frontage accessed by both McGregor Street and Monaro Avenue;

·        Visibility of the park to the wider community will be greatly improved;

·        Public surveillance into the park will be provided to the largest portion of the park;

·        Enables improved accessibility to the park for the wider community as the Reserve will no longer be landlocked;

·        The Reserve is within the 800m walkable catchment of the Kingsgrove Local Centre;

·        Expansion of an existing reserve will enable the design of a park that will have sufficient area to host a number of activities such as inclusive play areas and outdoor barbeque facilities; and

·        Expansion of the Reserve will assist in providing more open space towards the centre of the Hurstville Ward where there is the least amount of open space available to its residents.

171. The LPP was advised by the Report that Council does not have any intent of initiating any compulsory acquisition processes and that the proposal to acquire these sites will be added to Council’s existing acquisition program alongside the other properties identified on the existing LRA Map.

172. However, the LPP did not recommend proceeding with the proposed rezoning of 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove within the Planning Proposal for LEP21. The need for additional open space in the northern portion of the LGA was reiterated and Council was encouraged to undertaken further strategic documentation to justify the rezoning of these 6 properties. The LPP’s recommendations are available in Attachment 7.

173. The LPP’s recommendations are noted. However, the Planning Proposal retains the proposed rezoning and land reservation acquisition for the purpose of public open space at No.11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove. The rationale to rezone the properties from R2 to RE1 within LEP 2021 is based on:

·        Securing land for open space in an area in the LGA that is significantly deficient in open space,

·        Identification of the land parcels in the LEP and contributions framework in order to create a funding source for the purchase of the open space,

·        Creation of open space in an area of the LGA that was identified in the LSPS to be reviewed for an increase in the supply of housing and jobs.

Proposed Rezoning for Open Space

174.     An extract of the proposed LRA Map is provided in Figure 20 below:

Figure 20 – Extract of Proposed Land Reservation Acquisition Map

 

175. An extract of the proposed Land Zoning Map is provided in Figure 21 below:


 

Figure 21 – Extract of Proposed Land Zoning Map

176. The proposal to purchase these sites adds to the Council’s existing acquisition program within LEP 2020.

177. The Committee is to note:

·        Council does not have any intent of initiating any compulsory acquisition processes;

·        when a property is included on the LRA Map, the landowner can approach Council with the request for Council to purchase their property under the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 (“the Act”); and

·        In accordance with the Act, Council must acquire the land within 90 days after the owner gives notice. If Council fails to acquire the land within the timeframe then the land reservation must be removed.

178. The inclusion of 11-21 Monaro Avenue on the LRA Map will enable development contributions (also known as Section 7.11 and 7.12 contributions) to become available as a funding mechanism for the purchase of these properties. However, development contributions are levied on individual developments as they occur. As a result, the timeframe to collect contributions is typically distributed across the life of the Development Contribution Plan which may be 10 to 20 years.

179. To ensure consistency with the recommendations of the Local Planning Panel’s recommendation of June 2020, this report recommends that the Council endorse the General Manager to continue discussions with the land owners of 11- 21 Monaro Avenue Kingsgrove with the intention of entering in a legal agreement with each of the property owners to enable the Council to secure the purchase of the 6 lots and to provide financial certainty for these land owners. 


 

FSPA REVIEW

180. The draft LEP 2020 had originally proposed to reduce the extent of the existing Foreshore Scenic Protection Area (“FSPA”) in the former Hurstville LGA to exclude areas with lower sensitivities to change, as identified by the Foreshore Strategic Directions Paper (“the Paper”). The removal of these properties from the existing FSPA would have enabled increased development potential (i.e. eligible for dual occupancies) for 742 sites. This proposal was endorsed by the DPIE through the Gateway Determination. 

181. The Planning Proposal for the draft LEP 2020 was publicly exhibited from 1 April to 31 May 2020 (inclusive) and a total of 1,153 community submissions were received. The content of the submissions were categorised into 14 topic areas. 

182. A total of 510 submissions were received in relation to the FSPA with over 400 submissions objecting to the removal of properties within the FSPA due to impacts associated with overdevelopment as result of the increased dual occupancy development potential and the loss of vegetation and biodiversity through overdevelopment. The key issues raised in these objections are summarised as follows: 

·        Increase in housing density will impact flora and fauna in the area; many included references to specific trees, parks, gardens and fauna. 

·        Held the ‘green and leafy’ character in high regard, and expressed concern that reducing the extent of the existing FSPA would erode this character. 

·        All trees visible from the foreshore must be protected. 

·        Concerns about pollution, in particular water pollution from increased density and the potential impacts from run off into the Georges River. 

·        Objects to more development (i.e. more dual occupancies) and the associated amenity impacts such as traffic, on street parking, safety, privacy, and increase in demand for schools. 

·        Council should undertake a full biodiversity assessment of the LGA to inform the development of the new LEP. 

183. To address the concerns raised by the submissions in relation to the FSPA, the LPP made the following amendments to the draft LEP 2020: 

·        Increase the minimum landscaped area requirements for dual occupancies (non-FSPA) to 25% and dual occupancies (FSPA) to 30% and to ensure new developments are accompanied by increased planting and vegetation; 

·        Insert a new local provision to protect trees in the R2 and R3 zones; and 

·        Retain the existing extent of the FSPA in the Hurstville LEP while expanding the FSPA to the former Kogarah LGA in accordance with the as-exhibited version. 

184. However, further investigation was requested by the LPP in its recommendation:

2. The Panel recommends that Council as part of the preparation of the draft Local Environmental Plan in 2021/2022, further define the role, mapped extent and zoning of the FSPA, in both the former Hurstville and Kogarah Local Government Areas, having regard to those properties and ridge lines visible to and from the Georges River and its tributaries, and associated environmental protection applying to those areas in order to better reflect the objectives of Clause 6.7 of the Georges River Local Environmental Plan 2020. This may include the consideration of additional environmental protection zones or modifications of the FSPA.

185. In response to the concerns outlined by the LPP in its recommendation above, Council has commenced the preparation of two technical studies, being the Foreshore Scenic Character Review and the LGA-wide Biodiversity Study, utilising the DPIE grant funding with the intent of further investigating the role, mapped extent and zoning of the FSPA. 

186. The purpose of Foreshore Scenic Character Review (‘the Review’) to undertake a further review of the scenic character of the foreshore localities in the Georges River local government area (“LGA”) for the purpose of updating and refining the character analysis prepared by the Paper.  

187. The Review will build upon the existing evidence base provided by the Paper to further clarify the character typologies present in the visual catchment to and from the Georges River. The character analysis will include assessments of the existing scenic amenity and the environmental, social and character values of the foreshore for the purpose of reviewing the role, mapped extent and zoning of the foreshore scenic protection area (“FSPA”). 

188. The Review’s objectives are to: 

·        Determine the role and function of the existing FSPA; 

·        Assess the impact of the FSPA on development potential; 

·        Evaluate the effectiveness and relevance of the existing FSPA as a means of: 

o   Protecting the landscaped character of the foreshore environment; and 

o   Enforcing a homogenous neighbourhood character; 

·        Identify the extent of the visual catchment to and from the Georges River and its tributaries within the Study Area; 

·        Identify areas with high environmental values and sight lines to the foreshore; 

·        Develop a revised set of Character Typologies for properties located within the visual catchment; 

·        Enable an enhanced understanding of the foreshore locality and its local character by integrating the findings with the Biodiversity Study; 

·        Inform future amendments to the LEP 2020 and DCP 2020; and 

·        Consider alternative controls and provisions to better protect and enhance the scenic amenity and the environmental, social and character values of the foreshore. 

189. The proposed outcomes of the Review include the following:

·        Provide recommendations for an alternative approaches to protecting the scenic amenity and the environmental, social and character values of the foreshore.  

·        Construct view planes to preserve and protect the significant view corridors, especially from public open spaces like parks and reserves; 

·        Develop draft criteria for applicants to use when preparing view analysis studies for development applications; 

·        Recommend LEP and DCP controls that: 

o   Provide additional environmental protection to respond to presence of biodiversity (as identified by the Biodiversity Study); 

o   Review the role, extent and zoning of the FPSA; 

o   Maintain and enhance the neighbourhood character and the landscape character; 

o   Require development to respond positively to view corridors and encourage view sharing; 

o   Protect areas with high scenic values; and 

o   Provide heads of consideration when assessing a development application for development that may have an impact on scenic landscapes and view corridors; 

190. Council does not yet possess a comprehensive study of its total biodiversity, nor does it possess a Biodiversity Strategy. The purpose of this initial LGA-wide Biodiversity Study will be to investigate and report on the current biodiversity condition, location and protection measures through desktop analysis and field surveys.

191. The objectives of the Biodiversity Study are to:

·        Review all current biodiversity information for the LGA to establish what native flora and fauna species are occurring or likely to occur and establish baseline condition of biodiversity throughout the LGA. 

·        Identify any data gaps, as part of a review of background information to inform the biodiversity study and field work requirements  

·        Identify field survey requirements designed to confirm the presence of native flora and fauna species. 

·        Undertake targeted field surveys to identify flora and fauna species and endangered communities, as well as fauna habitat present in the LGA focusing on rare and threatened species as identified in the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 (NSW), associated Biodiversity Regulation 2017 and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Commonwealth). 

·        Validate areas of outstanding biodiversity value as seen on the NSW Biodiversity Values Map 

·        Undertake mapping of flora and fauna species, vegetation communities and localised biodiversity values including habitat corridors and linkages produced in GIS shape-files suitable for Council’s IntraMaps platform. 

·        Recommend the most appropriate courses of action to preserve and conserve biodiversity and to monitor change over time including indicators that are easily measured.

·        Recommend planning controls (i.e. Local Environmental Plan and Development Control Plan controls) in collaboration with consultant planners to enable better protection of the LGA’s biodiversity within the development process. 

192. The scope of the Biodiversity Study includes an implementation framework to be developed in collaboration with the team preparing the Foreshore Scenic Character Review for the purpose of recommending planning controls which will enable developments to appropriately respond to the presence of biodiversity. The framework is to:

·        Review the effectiveness of the existing LEP controls relating to biodiversity; 

·        Introduce alternative and/or new LEP controls to protect areas with high conservation value; 

·        Review the appropriateness of the existing zoning of land; 

·        Develop detailed Development Control Plan (DCP) controls to further strengthen the LEP controls.  

193. The Biodiversity Study developed under this brief will form the foundation for a future Biodiversity Strategy which will incorporate annual implementation planning that identifies specific tasks, timelines, responsibilities and priorities relating to biodiversity within the LGA. 

194. Once the two studies are completed, a separate planning proposal will be prepared to reflect an updated policy position on the FSPA based on the outcomes of the Review and the Biodiversity Study.  

 

REZONING REQUESTS

195. As part of the investigation for additional housing opportunities, all rezoning requests received as part of the public exhibition of the LSPS 2040 and draft LEP 2020 were reviewed against the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth for the potential inclusion within LEP21.

196. Council received 23 upzoning requests in total comprising of 18 requests for change in zone and/or development controls and 5 requests in relation to existing planning proposals under assessment.

197. The 5 requests relating to existing planning proposals have not been considered for the purpose of this investigation as the planning proposals are each subject to a separate assessment process.

198. The 18 upzoning requests have been assessed against the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth (refer Attachment 10) and are allocated into 2 categories for the purpose of establishing a formal policy position:

A.     Investigate in Council’s Strategies (e.g. the next Housing Strategy or Part 2 of the Commercial Centres Strategy) to inform future LEP amendments

B.     No further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth or to be pursued as part of a separate process which is not led by Council

199. A summary of the analysis is provided in Table 11 below:

 

Table 11– Overview of Council’s Policy Position on Rezoning Requests

Rezoning Request

Council’s Policy Position

1. Lily Street, Cronulla St and Botany Street, Hurstville

Category A - conduct further investigation as part of the future Housing Strategy in accordance with LSPS 2040.

2. 32-50 Wright St, 3-25 Orange St and 1 Orange Ln, Hurstville

Category A - conduct further investigation as part of the future Housing Strategy in accordance with LSPS 2040.

3. 60 Patrick Street, Hurstville (Salvation Army)

Category A – investigate locality as part of the future Housing Strategy.

4. Princes Highway, Torrens St and Beach Rd, Blakehurst

Category A – investigate locality as part of the future Housing Strategy.

5. 11 Northcott Ave, Kingsgrove

Category A - investigate locality as part of future Housing Strategy and/or Centres Review.

6. 70-80 Victoria Avenue, Mortdale

Category A - located within the study area of the Mortdale Local Centre Masterplan.

 

Awaiting outcomes of Masterplan to inform future Housing Strategy or Centres Review.

7. 80 Penshurst Street, Penshurst

Category A – further investigation required as part of the centres work to be undertaken.

 

Also awaiting outcomes of Mortdale Masterplan work to inform future Centres Review.

8. 4-16 Montgomery St, Kogarah (St George Bank)

Category A – further investigation required. This are is as part of the Kogarah Collaboration Area.

 

The Kogarah town centre is to be subject to its own Masterplan vision – informed by Collaboration Area work.

9. Short Street, Gray Street & Chapel Street, Kogarah

Category A – further investigation required. This are is as part of the Kogarah Collaboration Area.

 

The Kogarah town centre is to be subject to its own Masterplan vision – informed by Collaboration Area work.

10. 147 Rocky Point Rd, Beverley Park

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Upzoning does not have strategic merit

·    Isolated site

·    Not located close to transport infrastructure

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

11. 73 Vista Street, Sans Souci

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Isolated site

·    Not located close to transport infrastructure

·    Not located near a centre

·    Was the subject of a planning proposal and a Rezoning Review by DPIE - not supported at Rezoning Review

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

 

12. 192-194 Penshurst St, Penshurst (Salvation Army)

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Isolated site

·    Not located close to transport infrastructure

·    Not located adjacent to a local centre

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

 

13. 2 Tanner Avenue, Carlton (Salvation Army)

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Isolated site

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

·    Not located adjacent to a local centre

·    Adjacent B1 zoning is mostly shop top housing with no room for expansion

·    Sufficient increased density in the surrounding area

14. 41 Woids Ave, Allawah

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Sets undesirable precedent for expanding the R4 zone across the LGA outside of designated growth areas

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

·    Rezoning to higher density is likely to hinder the expansion of the adjoining school, which is an essential social infrastructure for the local community

15. 113-115 Hurstville Road, Oatley

Category B - no further consideration due to inconsistency with the LSPS Criteria to Guide Growth:

·    Isolated site

·    Not located close to transport infrastructure

·    Not located near a centre

·    Not located in assigned LSPS growth area

16. 53 Halstead Street, South Hurstville

Category B - no further consideration due to existing industrial land zoning – rezoning is inconsistent with the Georges River Industrial Land Review which was adopted by Council on 17 December 2018.

17. William Rd and Bennett Rd,  Riverwood

Category B – no further consideration as part of future Housing Strategy or Centres Review due to location within the Riverwood Planned Precinct.

 

Further investigation is required as part of the Riverwood Planned Precinct collaboration with the DPIE and Canterbury-Bankstown Council.

18. 23 Dalcassia Street & 22 Bond Street, Hurstville (Salvation Army)

Category B – no further consideration as submitter has contacted Council regarding the potential of a separate planning proposal.

 

200.     This report recommends that the staff notify the submitters of Council’s position on their rezoning requests.

ALIGNMENT WITH STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

201. The future vision for Greater Sydney to 2056 is clearly established in the Greater Sydney Region Plan – A Metropolis of Three Cities (“Region Plan”) and the supporting district plans released in March 2018. These plans are framed around 10 Directions relating to the four themes of infrastructure and collaboration, liveability, productivity and sustainability. The South District Plan is the applicable district plan for the Georges River LGA. 

202. To provide an alignment between the district and local levels of strategic planning, the State Government introduced legislation in early 2018 requiring councils to prepare a local strategic planning statement for the LGA. The Georges River LSPS 2040 was endorsed by the GSC on 4 March 2020 and is framed around the following 5 themes, each supported by Planning Priorities: 

·        Access and Movement 

·        Infrastructure and Community 

·        Housing and Neighbourhoods 

·        Economy and Centres 

·        Environment and Open Space 

203. The LSPS builds on the community’s aspirations and expectations expressed in Council’s Community Strategic Plan 2018 - 2028.  It is also aligned with the Greater Sydney Region Plan and South District Plan; and other State Government planning priorities.

204. A summary of the alignment between this Planning Proposal and the relevant South District Plan and LSPS Planning Priorities is categorised by the themes of infrastructure and collaboration, liveability and sustainability in Table 12 below:

Table 12 – Summary of Alignment with Planning Priorities

South District Plan Planning Priority

LSPS Planning Priority

Comment

Infrastructure and collaboration

S1. Planning for a city supported by infrastructure

 

P1. We have a range of frequent, efficient transport options to connect people, goods, services, businesses and educational facilities

 

P10. Homes are supported by safe, accessible, green, clean, creative and diverse facilities, services and spaces

The proposed rezoning of the Narwee HIA to accommodate new housing and encourage housing diversity is located within walking distance to public transport infrastructure (i.e Narwee Railway Station and bus stops with frequent bus services) and the existing Narwee village commercial centre. The Narwee HIA also has excellent access to existing open spaces with children’s playgrounds and picnic/BBQ facilities.

Liveability

S4. Fostering healthy, creative, culturally rich and socially connected communities

 

S5. Providing housing supply, choice and affordability with access to jobs, services and public transport

 

S6. Creating and renewing great places and local centres, and respecting the District’s heritage

 

 

P9. A mix of well-designed housing for all life stages caters for a range of lifestyle needs and incomes

 

P10. Homes are supported by safe, accessible, green, clean, creative and diverse facilities, services and spaces

 

P19. Everyone has access to quality, clean, useable, passive and active, open and green spaces and recreation places

This Planning Proposal provides additional housing through the up-zoning of an existing low density residential area in a highly accessible area serviced by shops, schools, and open space and community facilities. The creation of additional housing in the Narwee HIA will greatly assist with revitalising the existing Narwee village.

 

The combination of medium and high density developments proposed in the Narwee HIA allows a range of housing typologies to be delivered in response to the Georges River community’s need for more housing choice.

 

Furthermore, the formalisation of manor houses and terraces within the LEP will enable the provision of a diverse selection of medium density housing products to contribute to the LGA’s housing supply.

Sustainability

S16. Delivering high quality open space

P19. Everyone has access to quality, clean, useable, passive and active open and green spaces and recreation places

This Planning Proposal proposed to rezone 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove to RE1 Public Recreation will expand and improve access to an existing park, which will support existing and future residents of the LGA.

 


 

Consistency with SEPPs 

205. The Planning Proposal is consistent with a number of relevant State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs). A detailed assessment of the consistency is provided in Attachment 14.

Consistency with S9.1 Ministerial Directions

206. Ministerial Directions under Section 9.1 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 set out a range of matters to be considered when preparing an amendment to a Local Environmental Plan.

207. The Planning Proposal is consistent with a number of relevant Ministerial Directions. A detailed assessment of the consistency is provided in Attachment 15.

Financial Implications

208. Within budget allocation.

Risk Implications

209. No risks identified.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

210. Pre-exhibition consultation is proposed for the owners and occupiers of properties located within and adjacent to the Narwee HIA. This consultation process will be conducted in a similar format to the targeted consultation conducted for the LEP 2020 HIAs and will be comprised of the following engagement methods:

·        Targeted letters;

·        Fact sheet in plain-English outlining the proposed changes;

·        Dedicated email and phone call enquiries; and

·        Webinars and/or online meetings will be held where face-to-face meetings cannot be achieved.

211. Pre-exhibition consultation is also proposed for the owners and occupiers of properties at 11-21 Monaro Avenue, Kingsgrove.

212. Should the Planning Proposal be supported, it will be forwarded to the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces requesting a Gateway Determination. 

213. If a Gateway Determination (Approval) is issued for the Planning Proposal, it is anticipated public exhibition will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and its Regulation 2000, relevant COVID-19 Planning Orders and any requirements of the Gateway Determination. 

214. In accordance with the NSW Government’s Best Practice Guideline for LEPs and Council Land (dated January 1997), this Planning Proposal will be exhibited with a register which outlines the following for 5 Bryant Street, Narwee, which is located within the Narwee HIA and is a parcel of land under Crown Land ownership but Council manages the land and building:  

·        The nature of Council’s interest in the land - as the Reserve Land Manager Reserve No. 79156, gazetted on 15 March 1957;

·        When Council first acquired an interest in the land - 15 March 1957;

·        Why Council acquired an interest in the land - to act as Reserve Trust Manager of Crown Land;

·        How Council acquired its interest in the land - through the Government Gazettal on 15 March 1957; and

·        For land previously owned or controlled by Council, whether any aspect of the LEP formed part of the agreement to dispose of the land, and the terms of any such agreement - Council does not intend to change the existing operation of the land as a community child care centre through this Planning Proposal. Council is in the process of lease negotiation with the incumbent tenant.

215. The following material will be available during the exhibition period: 

·        Planning Proposal;

·        Relevant maps;

·        Plain English explanatory information;

·        Fact sheets; and

·        Description of the objectives and intended outcomes.

216. All information will be on Council’s website in accordance with Section 10.18 of the EP&A Act which requires all NSW councils to make public exhibition materials available digitally on Council’s websites. Hard copies will be made available at Council offices subject to compliance with the NSW Government’s Public Health Orders in relation to COVID-19.  

217. Notification of the public exhibition will be through: 

·        Newspaper advertisement in The Leader;

·        Exhibition notice on Council’s website;

·        Community engagement project on Council’s YourSay website;

·        Notices in Council offices and libraries (subject to compliance with the Public Health Orders in relation to COVID-19);

·        Letters to all landowners and occupiers in the areas where change to planning provisions and controls is proposed as well as surrounding areas;

·        Letters to State and Commonwealth Government agencies identified in the Gateway Determination; and

·        Webinars will be held where face-to-face meetings cannot be achieved.

NEXT STEPS

218. The anticipated project timeline for completion of the Planning Proposal is shown below in Table 13:

 

Table 13 – Anticipated project timeline

Task 

Anticipated Timeframe 

Report to Georges River LPP on Planning Proposal 

29 October 2020 (completed)

Report to Environment and Planning Committee on Planning Proposal 

9 November 2020

(this report)

Report to Council on Planning Proposal 

23 November 2020 

Planning Proposal to be forwarded to the DPIE for a Gateway Determination 

December 2020 

Anticipated commencement date (date of Gateway Determination) 

December 2020 

Timeframe for public exhibition (including both government agency and community consultation as required by Gateway Determination) 

January to February 2021 

Dates for public hearing (if required) 

N/A 

Timeframe for consideration of submissions  

February 2021 

Reporting to LPP/ Council on community consultation and finalisation 

March 2021 

Submission to the Department to finalise the LEP  

March 2021 

Anticipated date for notification 

April 2021 

 

219. It is noted that the project timeline will be assessed by the DPIE and may be amended by the Gateway Determination.

File Reference

D20/266492

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1

Letter of Support for LSPS dated 4 March 2020 - published in separate document

Attachment 2

Georges River Local Housing Strategy 2020 - published in separate document

Attachment 3

LEP 2020 Gateway Determination from DPIE dated 10 March 2020 - published in separate document

Attachment 4

Draft GRLEP 2020 Instrument for Reference - published in separate document

Attachment 5

Local Planning Panel Meeting Agenda - 29 October 2020 - LEP21 Referral - published in separate document

Attachment 6

Local Planning Panel Meeting Agenda - 29 October 2020 - Addendum Report to LEP21 Referral (11-21 Monaro Avenue Acquisition) - published in separate document

Attachment 7

Local Planning Panel Meeting Minutes - 29 October 2020 - LEP21 Referral and Addendum Report - published in separate document

Attachment 8

Preliminary Traffic Study HIAs - published in separate document

Attachment 9

Letter from DPIE - Accelerated LEP Review Program dated 16 October 2020 - published in separate document

Attachment 10

Review of Rezoning Requests from LSPS and LEP 2020 - published in separate document

Attachment 11

Planning Proposal Report - LEP21 - published in separate document

Attachment 12

PP Appendix 1 - Amended LEP Instrument - Manor Houses and Terraces - published in separate document

Attachment 13

PP Appendix 2 - Proposed LEP Mapping - published in separate document

Attachment 14

PP Appendix 3 - State Environmental Planning Policies - published in separate document

Attachment 15

PP Appendix 4 - Ministerial Directions - published in separate document